Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date



Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases








Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (NCL), also known as Batten disease, is a group of genetically distinct lysosomal disorders that mainly affect the central nervous system, resulting in progressive motor and cognitive decline primarily in children. Multiple distinct genes involved in the metabolism of lipids have been identified to date with various mutations in this family of diseases. There is no cure for these diseases but some new therapeutic approaches have been tested that offer more hope than the standard palliative care. Many of the therapeutic advances require invasive procedures but some progress in slowing the disease has been found and more options can be expected in the future. We also review the literature on children with disease/conditions other than NCL for the non-invasive use, safety, and tolerability of a lipid-lowering drug, gemfibrozil, as a potential treatment for NCLs. Gemfibrozil has shown efficacy in an animal model of NCL known as CLN2 (late infantile classic juvenile) and has been shown to be safe for lowering lipids in children. Among the 200 non-NCL children found in the published literature who were treated with gemfibrozil for NCL-related problems, only 3 experienced adverse events, including 2 with muscle pain and 1 with localized linear IgA bullous dermatitis. We conclude that gemfibrozil is safe for long-term use in children, causes minimal adverse events, is well tolerated, and may delay the progression of NCLs. Gemfibrozil may potentially be an alternative to more invasive therapeutic approaches currently under investigation and has the potential to be used in combination with other therapeutic approaches.


Reproduced with permission of BioMed Central Ltd. Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Peer Reviewed


Open Access




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