Title

Naturalistic driving measures of route selection associate with resting state networks in older adults

Authors

Julie K. Wisch, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Catherine M. Roe, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Ganesh M. Babulal, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Nicholas Metcalf, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Ann M. Johnson, Center for Clinical Studies, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Samantha Murphy, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Jamie Hicks, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Jason M. Doherty, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
John C. Morris, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA.
Beau M. Ances, Department of Neurology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8111, St. Louis, MO, 63110, USA. bances@wustl.edu.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

4-20-2022

Journal

Scientific reports

Volume

12

Issue

1

DOI

10.1038/s41598-022-09919-x

Abstract

Our objective was to identify functional brain changes that associate with driving behaviors in older adults. Within a cohort of 64 cognitively normal adults (age 60+), we compared naturalistic driving behavior with resting state functional connectivity using machine learning. Functional networks associated with the ability to interpret and respond to external sensory stimuli and the ability to multi-task were associated with measures of route selection. Maintenance of these networks may be important for continued preservation of driving abilities.

Department

Clinical Research and Leadership

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