Title

Automatic brain segmentation in preterm infants with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus using 3D Bayesian U-Net

Authors

Axel Largent, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Josepheen De Asis-Cruz, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Kushal Kapse, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Scott D. Barnett, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Jonathan Murnick, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Sudeepta Basu, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Nicole Andersen, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Stephanie Norman, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Nickie Andescavage, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Catherine Limperopoulos, Developing Brain Institute, Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children's National Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-13-2022

Journal

Human brain mapping

DOI

10.1002/hbm.25762

Keywords

Bayesian deep learning; Monte Carlo dropout; automatic brain segmentation; post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus; preterm infants; uncertainty assessment

Abstract

Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) is a severe complication of intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in very preterm infants. PHH monitoring and treatment decisions rely heavily on manual and subjective two-dimensional measurements of the ventricles. Automatic and reliable three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the ventricles may provide a more accurate assessment of PHH, and lead to improved monitoring and treatment decisions. To accurately and efficiently obtain these 3D measurements, automatic segmentation of the ventricles can be explored. However, this segmentation is challenging due to the large ventricular anatomical shape variability in preterm infants diagnosed with PHH. This study aims to (a) propose a Bayesian U-Net method using 3D spatial concrete dropout for automatic brain segmentation (with uncertainty assessment) of preterm infants with PHH; and (b) compare the Bayesian method to three reference methods: DenseNet, U-Net, and ensemble learning using DenseNets and U-Nets. A total of 41 T -weighted MRIs from 27 preterm infants were manually segmented into lateral ventricles, external CSF, white and cortical gray matter, brainstem, and cerebellum. These segmentations were used as ground truth for model evaluation. All methods were trained and evaluated using 4-fold cross-validation and segmentation endpoints, with additional uncertainty endpoints for the Bayesian method. In the lateral ventricles, segmentation endpoint values for the DenseNet, U-Net, ensemble learning, and Bayesian U-Net methods were mean Dice score = 0.814 ± 0.213, 0.944 ± 0.041, 0.942 ± 0.042, and 0.948 ± 0.034 respectively. Uncertainty endpoint values for the Bayesian U-Net were mean recall = 0.953 ± 0.037, mean negative predictive value = 0.998 ± 0.005, mean accuracy = 0.906 ± 0.032, and mean AUC = 0.949 ± 0.031. To conclude, the Bayesian U-Net showed the best segmentation results across all methods and provided accurate uncertainty maps. This method may be used in clinical practice for automatic brain segmentation of preterm infants with PHH, and lead to better PHH monitoring and more informed treatment decisions.

Department

Pediatrics

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