Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-3-2014

Journal

Biology Direct

Volume

Volume 9

Inclusive Pages

Article number 9

DOI

10.1186/1745-6150-9-9

Keywords

Fungal Proteins--genetics; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide; Proteome--genetics; Saccharomyces cerevisiae--genetics

Abstract

Background

We have previously suggested a method for proteome wide analysis of variation at functional residues wherein we identified the set of all human genes with nonsynonymous single nucleotide variation (nsSNV) in the active site residue of the corresponding proteins. 34 of these proteins were shown to have a 1:1:1 enzyme:pathway:reaction relationship, making these proteins ideal candidates for laboratory validation through creation and observation of specific yeast active site knock-outs and downstream targeted metabolomics experiments. Here we present the next step in the workflow toward using yeast metabolic modeling to predict human metabolic behavior resulting from nsSNV.

Results

For the previously identified candidate proteins, we used the reciprocal best BLAST hits method followed by manual alignment and pathway comparison to identify 6 human proteins with yeast orthologs which were suitable for flux balance analysis (FBA). 5 of these proteins are known to be associated with diseases, including ribose 5-phosphate isomerase deficiency, myopathy with lactic acidosis and sideroblastic anaemia, anemia due to disorders of glutathione metabolism, and two porphyrias, and we suspect the sixth enzyme to have disease associations which are not yet classified or understood based on the work described herein.

Conclusions

Preliminary findings using the Yeast 7.0 FBA model show lack of growth for only one enzyme, but augmentation of the Yeast 7.0 biomass function to better simulate knockout of certain genes suggested physiological relevance of variations in three additional proteins. Thus, we suggest the following four proteins for laboratory validation: delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, ferrochelatase, ribose-5 phosphate isomerase and mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase. This study indicates that the predictive ability of this method will improve as more advanced, comprehensive models are developed. Moreover, these findings will be useful in the development of simple downstream biochemical or mass-spectrometric assays to corroborate these predictions and detect presence of certain known nsSNVs with deleterious outcomes. Results may also be useful in predicting as yet unknown outcomes of active site nsSNVs for enzymes that are not yet well classified or annotated.

Comments

Reproduced with permission of Biology Direct.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Peer Reviewed

1

Open Access

1

Table A1.xlsx (294 kB)
SNVDis Results (duplicates removed).

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