Title

Parental Concerns about Child and Adolescent Caffeinated Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Intake and Perceived Barriers to Reducing Consumption.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-25-2020

Journal

Nutrients

Volume

12

Issue

4

DOI

10.3390/nu12040885

Grant Information

CTSI FUNDED.

This research was supported, in part, by a Cross-Disciplinary Research Fund Award (PI: Sylvetsky) from The George Washington University. This research was also supported, in part, by Award Numbers UL1TR001876 and KL2TR001877 from the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences or the National Institutes of Health. The APC was also funded by the above listed sources

Abstract

Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption contributes to obesity and chronic disease. SSB intake in children and adolescents remains well above recommendations and reducing intake is challenging. In addition to high sugar content, SSBs are the predominant source of caffeine among youth. However, whether caffeine in SSBs presents unique barriers to reducing consumption is unknown. Herein, we examine parental concerns about child caffeinated-SSB (CSSB) intake and describe parent-reported barriers to lowering their child's consumption. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 21 parents of children and adolescents 8-17 years of age. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded using Nvivo™, and key themes were identified. Most parents expressed concern about child CSSB consumption, primarily with regard to dietary (e.g., excess sugar), health (e.g., obesity, diabetes) and/or behavioral (e.g., hyperactivity) consequences of frequent intake. Several key barriers to CSSB restriction were reported, encompassing six emergent themes: widespread availability and accessibility; child non-compliance when asked not to drink CSSBs; peer and cultural influences; negative child response to CSSB restriction; family eating behaviors; and, child preferences for CSSBs versus other beverages. Consideration of these barriers, along with the development of novel approaches to address these challenges, will likely bolster success in interventions aimed at reducing CSSB intake among children and adolescents.

Comments

This is an open access article.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Peer Reviewed

1

Open Access

1

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