Title

Comparison of Clinical Features of COVID-19 vs Seasonal Influenza A and B in US Children

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

9-1-2020

Journal

JAMA network open

Volume

3

Issue

9

DOI

10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.20495

Abstract

Importance: Compared with seasonal influenza, the clinical features and epidemiologic characteristics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) in US children remain largely unknown. Objective: To describe the similarities and differences in clinical features between COVID-19 and seasonal influenza in US children. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included children who were diagnosed with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 between March 25 and May 15, 2020, and children diagnosed with seasonal influenza between October 1, 2019, and June 6, 2020, at Children's National Hospital in the District of Columbia. Exposures: COVID-19 or influenza A or B. Main Outcomes and Measures: Rates of hospitalization, admission to the intensive care unit, and mechanical ventilator use and the association between underlying medical conditions, clinical symptoms, and COVID-19 vs seasonal influenza. Results: The study included 315 patients diagnosed with COVID-19 (164 [52%] male; median age, 8.3 years [range, 0.03-35.6 years]) and 1402 patients diagnosed with seasonal influenza (743 [53%] male; median age, 3.9 years [range, 0.04-40.4 years]). Patients with COVID-19 and those with seasonal influenza had a similar hospitalization rate (54 [17%] vs 291 [21%], P = .15), intensive care unit admission rate (18 [6%] vs 98 [7%], P = .42), and use of mechanical ventilators (10 [3%] vs 27 [2%], P = .17). More patients hospitalized with COVID-19 than with seasonal influenza reported fever (41 [76%] vs 159 [55%], P = .005), diarrhea or vomiting (14 [26%] vs 36 [12%], P = .01), headache (6 [11%] vs 9 [3%], P = .01), body ache or myalgia (12 [22%] vs 20 [7%], P = .001), and chest pain (6 [11%] vs 9 [3%], P = .01). Differences between patients hospitalized with COVID-19 vs influenza who reported cough (24 [48%] vs 90 [31%], P = .05) and shortness of breath (16 [30%] vs 59 [20%], P = .13) were not statistically significant. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US children with COVID-19 or seasonal influenza, there was no difference in hospitalization rates, intensive care unit admission rates, and mechanical ventilator use between the 2 groups. More patients hospitalized with COVID-19 than with seasonal influenza reported clinical symptoms at the time of diagnosis.

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