Title

Surgical management of functional constipation: An intermediate report of a new approach using a laparoscopic sigmoid resection combined with malone appendicostomy

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-1-2018

Journal

Journal of Pediatric Surgery

Volume

53

Issue

6

DOI

10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2018.02.074

Keywords

Functional constipation; Idiopathic constipation; Pediatric

Abstract

© 2018 Elsevier Inc. Introduction: We previously reported our surgical technique for functional constipation for patients who have failed medical management using a novel collaborative approach with gastroenterology input, pre-operative contrast enema, colonic manometry, and laxative protocol combined with a laparoscopic colonic resection with Malone appendicostomy. Now we report our intermediate outcomes. Methods: Patients who failed bowel management program for functional constipation were reviewed from 3/2014–2/2017. Patients with Hirschsprung disease, anorectal malformation, tethered cord, spina bifida, Trisomy 21, cerebral palsy, mitochondrial disease, or prior colon resection were excluded. Results: Of 31 patients (14 females; median age 12 years, follow-up 10.3 months) with functional constipation and failed medical management, 26 (84%) had preoperative colonic manometry which, in addition to the contrast enema, guided laparoscopic colon resection. Ten patients (32.3%) are clean with no flushes (1 takes no laxatives, 8 are on low dose laxatives only, and 1 patient was clean on laxatives but chose to switch back to flushes). Of the 21 patients that remain on antegrade flushes, 20 (95.2%) are clean, and one patient (4.8%) continues to soil. We define clean as no soiling and no abnormal stool burden on x-ray. Laxative trials are planned for all patients on an antegrade flush regimen. Conclusion: Our intermediate results show that laparoscopic colon resection with Malone appendicostomy allows the majority of patients to be clean on antegrade flushes, and some to be on no or minimal laxatives. Type of study: Retrospective review. Level of Evidence: 3

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