Title

Miller fisher syndrome presents as an acute voice change to hypernasal speech

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

5-1-2010

Journal

Laryngoscope

Volume

120

Issue

5

DOI

10.1002/lary.20876

Keywords

Acroparesthesia; Guillain-Barré; Hypernasal speech; Miller-Fisher syndrome; Syndrome

Abstract

The authors describe a 38-year-old man who presented with hypernasality, perioral and acroparesthesia, dyspnea, and dysphagia. Further evaluation revealed a diagnosis of Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS). MFS is a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome previously described in neurology and critical care journals; however, there is a paucity of work concerning this disease in the otolaryngology literature. An acute change in voice usually occurs secondary to inflammatory processes as seen after intubation and infection, but can occur as part of a more complex disease entity such as Guillain-Barré or Miller-Fisher syndrome. As such, clinicians should consider this in their evaluation of rhinolalia aperta. © 2010 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

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