Title

Emerging Technology: Hyperspectral Imaging

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1-2004

Journal

Perspectives in Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Therapy

Volume

16

Issue

1

DOI

10.1177/153100350401600114

Keywords

calcified atherosclerotic vessels; hyperspectral imaging; peripheral vascular disease

Abstract

Clinical decision-making in managing the patient with peripheral vascular disease is dependent upon patient history, physical examination, and noninvasive and invasive testing. Noninvasive testing currently includes the ankle-brachial index, pulse volume recordings, and transcutaneous oximetry. Each test yields information regarding perfusion and tissue oxygenation, but has limitations. The ankle-brachial index compares lower extremity blood pressure with the upper extremity, but it must be interpreted with caution in a patient with calcified atherosclerotic vessels, as is seen with diabetic patients, which can lead to an overestimation of actual pressure. Pulse volume recordings are mainly a qualitative estimation of distal perfusion and are highly dependent on the operator, which introduces both intraobserver and interobserver variability. Duplex ultrasound evaluation looses sensitivity in the small vessels of the limb and can be limited by instrument and operator. Transcutaneous oximetry is a quantitative measure of skin (end organ) oxygenation, but is limited by only evaluating one small area of the foot at a given time. Hyperspectral imaging was developed to possibly provide quantitative information regarding the spatial tissue oxygen saturation in patients with peripheral vascular disease. © 2004, Sage Publications. All rights reserved.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS