Title

Using Artistic-Narrative to Stimulate Reflection on Physician Bias

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1-2014

Journal

Teaching and Learning in Medicine

Volume

26

Issue

4

DOI

10.1080/10401334.2014.945032

Keywords

artistic narrative; physician bias; qualitative research; sickle cell disease

Abstract

© 2014, Copyright © 2014, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Background: Physician bias toward patients directly impacts patient care and health outcomes. However, too little research has been done investigating avenues to bring about self-awareness in this area to eliminate commonly held stereotypes that fuel physician bias. Purposes: The purpose of this study was to explore the ways in which 2nd-year medical students’ reflected on an artistic-narrative presentation given by a woman with sickle cell disease. Methods: A total of 320 2nd-year medical student essays were reviewed for content relevant to the artistic-narrative presentation. A total of 75 essays were identified and served as the data for this study. These 75 essays were analyzed using qualitative interpretive thematic content analysis to identify students’ perceptions and reflections on culture in the healthcare environment and the patient–provider relationship. Results: The analysis of the reflective essays revealed that this exercise helped students acknowledge physician bias in pain treatment, foster empathetic views toward patients as individuals, and recognize various ways in which biased beliefs can provide incite in healthcare disparities. Conclusions: These findings suggest that the combination of methods—art, narrative, and written reflection—helped students acknowledge their own bias as well as the ways in which taken-for-granted assumptions and biases can influence patient care.

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