Title

Is bacteriological testing of bladder urine informative in acute obstructive pyelo- nephritis?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

7-1-2017

Journal

Urologiia (Moscow, Russia : 1999)

Issue

3

DOI

10.18565/urol.2017.3.10-15

Keywords

bacteriological examination of urine; complicated infections of the upper urinary tract; microbiota of urine; percutaneous puncture nephrostomy; stenting

Abstract

The problem of the etiology and pathogenesis of acute obstructive pyelonephritis (OOP) remains one of the challenging issues of modern urology. Etiological agents of pyelonephritis can be both gram-negative and gram-positive opportunistic bacteria mostly belonging to the normal flora in humans. The generally accepted diagnostic work-up involves a bacteriological testing of not pelvic urine, but of bladder urine collected by a transurethral catheter or midstream specimens of urine collected from the patients. The aim of our study was to compare the microbiota of bladder and pelvic urine in patients with OOP.MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprised 72 sequentially selected patients (12 men and 60 women) with OOP associated with ureteral stones. Mean age of patients was 53.7+/-0.5 years. All patients underwent bacteriological examination of the bladder urine collected by a transurethral catheter and pelvic urine obtained after relieving stone-related ureteral obstruction. Urinary diversion was performed using j-j stent and PCN in 64 and 8 patients, respectively. Preoperative prophylactic antibiotics were administered routinely. Bacteriological testing of urine was carried out using an extended set (9-10) of culture media. Empirical antibiotic therapy was initiated only after the restoration of urine outflow from the kidney and continued for 5-6 days until the availability of bacteriological testing results.RESULTS: Levels of bacteriuria with Enterobacteria, gram-positive pathogens and NAB in two urine samples did not differ significantly (p>0.05). There was a wide range of bacteriuria from 101 to 106 CFU/ml of most microorganisms except @Proteus spp., S. aureus. In bladder urine, the rates of bacteriuria of more or equal 104 CFU/ml for E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. were 90.9%, 72.7% and 100.0%, respectively. For the remaining microorganisms, predominant bacteriuria was less or equal 103 CFU/ml. In pelvic urine, the rates of bacteriuria of more or equal 104 CFU/ml for E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and Proteus spp. was 71.8%, 40.0% and 66.7%, respectively. Other uropathogens in the pelvic urine mainly had a bacterial count of less or equal 103 CFU/ml. Only the concentration of Corynebacterium spp. in the pelvic urine significantly (p=0.023) differed from that of the bladder urine. There were no significant differences between microbiota of bladder and pelvic urine depending on duration of OOP except higher rates of Corynebacterium spp. in the bladder urine.

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