Title

Cancer screening in women by internal medicine resident physicians

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1-1997

Journal

Southern Medical Journal

Volume

90

Issue

11

DOI

10.1097/00007611-199711000-00009

Abstract

Background. Research suggests that women may not have consistent cancer surveillance. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of internal medicine resident physicians' screening methods for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer of women aged 50 or older. Results. Resident physicians did breast examinations in 39.1%, mammography in 37.3%, Pap smears in 32.7%, rectal examinations in 37.3%, fecal occult blood testing in 39.1%, and flexible sigmoidoscopy in 11.8% of the women. They instructed 3.6% to do breast self-examination. There was no statistically significant difference in the breast or cervical cancer screening based on patient race, insurance type, or sex of physician. Female physicians did more rectal examinations and fecal occult blood testing than male physicians. There was no statistically significant difference in colorectal cancer surveillance based on physician race or insurance status. Conclusions. We need to increase cancer screening in women. Assessment of the impact of the sex of the physician on cancer surveillance needs to be further evaluated.

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