Title

Stop the Pop: A Mixed-Methods Study Examining Children's Physical and Emotional Responses during Three Days of Sugary Drink Cessation

Authors

Jasmine H. Kaidbey, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Kacey Ferguson, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Sabrina E. Halberg, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Caroline Racke, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Amanda J. Visek, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Ashley N. Gearhardt, Department of Psychology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.
Laura M. Juliano, Department of Psychology, American University, Washington, DC 20016, USA.
William H. Dietz, Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Jennifer Sacheck, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.
Allison C. Sylvetsky, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Milken Institute School of Public Health, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

3-22-2022

Journal

Nutrients

Volume

14

Issue

7

DOI

10.3390/nu14071328

Keywords

adolescents; behavior; beverage consumption; home environment; interventions; juice drinks; soda; soft drinks; sugar-sweetened beverages; youth

Abstract

Despite public health efforts to reduce sugary drink consumption, children's intake continues to exceed recommendations. While numerous barriers to lowering sugary drink consumption have been identified, aversive feelings during sugary drink cessation may further challenge sustained reduction in children's sugary drink consumption. Herein, we describe "Stop the Pop", an intervention to examine children's physical and emotional responses during three days of sugary drink cessation. Children ( = 150) ages 8-14, who reported habitual consumption of ≥12 ounces of sugary drinks daily, were instructed to avoid sweetened beverages for three days. At baseline and on each day of cessation, children completed a daily feelings questionnaire, and a subset of children ( = 30) also completed a qualitative interview following cessation. During sugary drink cessation, children reported physical and emotional improvements, including being less tired, angry, and annoyed; having less trouble sleeping; and less frequently arguing with others, getting in trouble, and getting mad. However, unfavorable responses, such as mood disturbances and having less energy, were reported by some participants. Our results suggest that children who habitually consume sugary drinks may experience physical and emotional improvements during short-term sugary drink cessation, although longer-term examination is needed and inter-individual variability in responses to cessation warrants further study.

Department

Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Share

COinS