Title

Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy and Urological Complications in Type 1 Diabetes: Findings From the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications Study

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1-2022

Journal

Diabetes care

Volume

45

Issue

1

DOI

10.2337/dc21-1276

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate associations between diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and urological complications in men and women with type 1 diabetes (T1D). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Measurements of DPN at Epidemiology of Diabetes Intervention and Complications (EDIC) years 1, 14, and 17 and urological complications at EDIC year 17 were examined in 635 men (mean age 51.6 years, diabetes duration 29.5 years) and 371 women (mean age 50.6 years, diabetes duration 29.8 years) enrolled in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)/EDIC study. DPN was defined by symptoms, signs, and abnormal electrophysiology or by abnormal Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) examination or questionnaire scores. RESULTS: Erectile dysfunction (ED) in combination with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) was reported in 15% of men and female sexual dysfunction (FSD), LUTS, and urinary incontinence (UI) in 16% of women. Adjusted for age, drinking status, BMI, depression, DCCT/EDIC time-weighted mean HbA1c, microalbuminuria, hypertension, triglycerides, and statin medication use, the odds of reporting ED and LUTS versus no ED or LUTS at EDIC year 17 were 3.52 (95% CI 1.69, 7.31) times greater in men with confirmed DPN at EDIC year 13/14 compared to men without confirmed DPN. Compared to men without DPN, men with DPN based on abnormal MNSI examination or questionnaire scores had significantly higher odds of reporting ED and LUTS versus no ED or LUTS at EDIC year 17. There were no significant differences in DPN between women reporting both FSD and LUTS/UI compared with those without FSD or LUTS/UI at EDIC year 17. CONCLUSIONS: In long-standing T1D, DPN is associated with the later development of urological complications in men.

Department

Epidemiology

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