Title

An educational video's impact on the induction of labor experience: a randomized controlled trial

Authors

Sara Rahman, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff). Electronic address: rahman.sara@gmail.com.
Shawn Kripalani, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Emma Keegan, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Andrew Sparks, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Richard Amdur, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Gaby Moawad, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Sheetal Sheth, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).
Jordan Klebanoff, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, The George Washington University Hospital, Washington, DC (Dr Rahman, Mr Kripalani, Ms Keegan, Mr Sparks, and Drs Amdur, Moawad, Sheth, and Klebanoff); Main Line HealthCare Gynecology, Lankenau Medical Center, Wynnewood, PA (Dr Klebanoff).

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

1-1-2022

Journal

American journal of obstetrics & gynecology MFM

Volume

4

Issue

1

DOI

10.1016/j.ajogmf.2021.100495

Keywords

education; induction; knowledge; randomized controlled trial; satisfaction; video

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Induction of labor is a common obstetrical intervention; much research focuses on medical indications, clinical outcomes, and induction agents. Little research has been conducted evaluating the patients' understanding of and satisfaction with induction of labor. Video-based educational tools have been validated as a practical and efficient counseling method by previous studies. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate whether an educational video enhances the patients' knowledge about induction of labor and improves satisfaction with the induction of labor process. STUDY DESIGN: This was a single-center study in which women undergoing a scheduled induction of labor were randomized to either the control or intervention group. The control group was given a knowledge questionnaire about induction of labor before meeting their provider (midwife or obstetrician) on the day of scheduled induction of labor. The intervention group was shown a 3-minute educational video about induction of labor before administration of the knowledge questionnaire. Both groups, 24 to 48 hours after delivery, were asked to fill out a second questionnaire about satisfaction with the induction of labor process. Moreover, the video intervention group was asked to evaluate the video in the second questionnaire. Both knowledge and satisfaction questionnaires were compared between the control and intervention groups. RESULTS: From October 2019 to February 2020, 145 women scheduled for induction of labor were eligible and approached for the study. Of the 145 participants, 129 consented and 119 completed the entire study. Moreover, 64 participants were randomized into the control group and 55 into the intervention group. Compared with patients in the control group, the patients who watched the educational video in the intervention group had significantly improved baseline knowledge about induction of labor (P<.001). Knowledge scores remained significantly higher in the intervention group when considering participants who had a previous induction of labor (parity, P<.001; nulliparity, P<.001; multiparity, P<.001). In addition, satisfaction with the induction of labor process among participants in the intervention group was significantly higher than those in the control group (P<.001). Moreover, this held true in those who had a cesarean delivery or had a history of a previous induction of labor (P<.003 and P<.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: A brief educational video about induction of labor improved the patients' knowledge about the induction of labor process and their overall satisfaction with their delivery experience. Video-based education can play an innovative and important role in patient knowledge and satisfaction with the induction of labor process.

Department

Obstetrics and Gynecology

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