Title

The International Network on Oesophageal Atresia (INoEA) consensus guidelines on the transition of patients with oesophageal atresia-tracheoesophageal fistula

Authors

Usha Krishnan, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Usha.Krishnan@health.nsw.gov.au.
Michael W. Dumont, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK.
Hayley Slater, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK.
Benjamin D. Gold, Children's Center for Digestive Health Care, GI Care for Kids, LLC, Atlanta, GA, USA.
David Seguy, University of Lille, Reference Centre for Rare Oesophageal Diseases, CHU Lille, Lille, France.
Mikael Bouin, University of Montreal, CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM), Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
Rene Wijnen, Department of Paediatric Surgery, Erasmus Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
Luigi Dall'Oglio, Digestive Surgery and Endoscopy Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy.
Mario Costantini, Department of Surgical, Oncological and Gastroenterological Sciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
Anastassios C. Koumbourlis, Division of Pulmonary & Sleep Medicine, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.
Thomas A. Kovesi, Deptartment of Paediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Michael J. Rutter, Division of Paediatric Otolaryngology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
Marlene Soma, School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Jessica Menzies, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Sydney Children's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Audrey Van Malleghem, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire De Lille, Lille, France.
Nathalie Rommel, Department of Gastroenterology, Department of Neurogastroenterology and Motility, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium.
Michaela Dellenmark-Blom, Department of Paediatric Surgery, The Queen Silvia Children's hospital, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Vuokko Wallace, Department of Psychology, University of Bath, Bath, UK.
Evelyn Culnane, Transition Support Service, The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
Graham Slater, EAT Oesophageal Atresia Global Support Groups e.V., Stuttgart, Germany.
Frederic Gottrand, University of Lille, Reference Centre for Rare Oesophageal Diseases, CHU Lille, Lille, France.
Christophe Faure, Division of Paediatric Gastroenterology & Oesophagus Development and Engineering Lab, Sainte-Justine Hospital, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-7-2023

Journal

Nature reviews. Gastroenterology & hepatology

DOI

10.1038/s41575-023-00789-w

Abstract

Oesophageal atresia-tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF) is a common congenital digestive disease. Patients with EA-TEF face gastrointestinal, surgical, respiratory, otolaryngological, nutritional, psychological and quality of life issues in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Although consensus guidelines exist for the management of gastrointestinal, nutritional, surgical and respiratory problems in childhood, a systematic approach to the care of these patients in adolescence, during transition to adulthood and in adulthood is currently lacking. The Transition Working Group of the International Network on Oesophageal Atresia (INoEA) was charged with the task of developing uniform evidence-based guidelines for the management of complications through the transition from adolescence into adulthood. Forty-two questions addressing the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of gastrointestinal, surgical, respiratory, otolaryngological, nutritional, psychological and quality of life complications that patients with EA-TEF face during adolescence and after the transition to adulthood were formulated. A systematic literature search was performed based on which recommendations were made. All recommendations were discussed and finalized during consensus meetings, and the group members voted on each recommendation. Expert opinion was used when no randomized controlled trials were available to support the recommendation. The list of the 42 statements, all based on expert opinion, was voted on and agreed upon.

Department

Pediatrics

COinS