Title

Regional adaptation of the education in palliative and end-of-life Care Pediatrics (EPEC-Pediatrics) curriculum in Eurasia

Authors

Michael J. McNeil, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Bella Ehrlich, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Taisiya Yakimkova, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Huiqi Wang, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Volha Mishkova, Belarusian Research Center for Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, Minsk, Belarus.
Zhanna Bezler, Belarusian Clinical Center of Palliative Care for Children, Minsk, Belarus.
Ella Kumirova, Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology, Moscow, Russia.
Arshia Madni, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Narine Movsisyan, Yerevan State Medical University After Mkhitar Heratsi, Yerevan, Armenia.
Karen Williams, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Baglan Baizakova, George Washington University, The Milken Institute School of Public Health, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.
Marina Borisevich, Belarusian Research Center for Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, Minsk, Belarus.
Georgia Chatman, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Indira Erimbetova, The Republican Center for Hematology and Blood Transfusion, Tashkent, Uzbekistan.
Ximena Garcia Quintero, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Rodica Golban, Institute of Oncology of Republic of Moldova, Moldova, Chisinau.
Brandi Kirby, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Paola Nunez, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Radhikesh Ranadive, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Nadezhda Sakhar, Republican Scientific and Practical Center for Pediatric Surgery, Minsk, Belarus.
Jason Sonnenfelt, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Alisa Volkova, Raisa Gorbacheva Memorial Research Institute for Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Transplantation, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Daniel Moreira, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Stefan J. Friedrichsdorf, Benioff Children's Hospitals, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.
Joanne Wolfe, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Stacy Remke, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.
Joshua Hauser, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Meenakshi Devidas, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Justin N. Baker, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.
Asya Agulnik, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

9-8-2022

Journal

Cancer medicine

DOI

10.1002/cam4.5213

Keywords

Eurasia; education; pediatric oncology; pediatric palliative care

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pediatric palliative care (PPC) is a priority to improve pediatric hematology oncology (PHO) care in Eurasia. However, there are limited regional opportunities for PPC education. We describe the adaptation and implementation of a bilingual end-user Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care (EPEC)-Pediatrics course for PHO clinicians in Eurasia. METHODS: Due to COVID-19, this course was delivered virtually, consisting of prerecorded, asynchronous lectures, and a bilingual workshop with interactive lectures and small group sessions. A pre-postcourse design was used to evaluate the knowledge acquisition of the participants including their knowledge alignment with World Health Organization (WHO) guidance, ideal timing of palliative care, and comfort in providing palliative care to their patients. Questions were mostly quantitative with multiple choice or Likert scale options, supplemented by free-text responses. RESULTS: A total of 44 (76%) participants from 14 countries completed all components of the course including pre- and postcourse assessments. Participant alignment with WHO guidance improved from 75% in the pre- to 90% in the postcourse assessments (p < 0.001). After participation, 93% felt more confident controlling the suffering of children at the end of life, 91% felt more confident in prescribing opioids and managing pain, and 98% better understood how to hold difficult conversations with patients and families. Most participants (98%) stated that they will change their clinical practice based on the skills and knowledge gained in this course. CONCLUSIONS: We present a successful regional adaptation of the EPEC-Pediatrics curriculum, including novel delivery of course content via a virtual bilingual format. This course resulted in significant improvement in participant attitudes and knowledge of PPC along with an understanding of the ideal timing of palliative care consultation and comfort in providing PPC to children with cancer. We plan to incorporate participant feedback to improve the course and repeat it annually to improve access to high-quality palliative care education for PHO clinicians in Eurasia.

Department

Public Health Student Works

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