Title

Pediatric sleep apnea and viral respiratory infections: what do clinicians need to know?

Document Type

Editorial

Publication Date

2-22-2022

Journal

Expert review of respiratory medicine

DOI

10.1080/17476348.2022.2045959

Keywords

OSA; airway; children; pediatrics; virus

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common form of sleep-disordered breathing in children occurring in approximately 1% to 5% of the pediatric population (1). OSA is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction that cause intermittent hypoxia and/or frequent arousals (1). OSA affects all pediatric age groups with two clear peak periods. The first peak is in the preschool age, corresponding to the time of adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy, and the second is during adolescence when obesity becomes more prevalent (1). Early diagnosis of the condition is essential to reduce the occurrence of complications over time. Untreated OSA has been associated with behavioral problems, learning difficulties, cardiovascular complications, and growth retardation. Risk factors for pediatric OSA include prematurity, obesity, allergic rhinitis, and syndromic conditions (1). Investigating additional OSA risk factors in children may lead to interventions that reduce health-related costs and long-term complications of this prevalent condition.

Department

Pediatrics

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