Title

Is seizure disorder a risk factor for complications following surgical treatment of hip dysplasia in the pediatric population?

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

6-27-2022

Journal

Journal of pediatric orthopedics. Part B

DOI

10.1097/BPB.0000000000000998

Abstract

The impact of seizure disorders on pediatric patients who undergo hip dysplasia surgery has yet to be elucidated. This study focused on identifying the effect of seizure disorders on the incidence of complications following surgical management of hip dysplasia. Pediatric patients undergoing surgical treatment for hip dysplasia from 2012 to 2019 were identified in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric database. Patients were divided into two cohorts: patients with and patients without a seizure disorder. Patient demographics, comorbidities and postoperative outcomes were compared between the two groups. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Of 10 853 pediatric patients who underwent hip dysplasia surgery, 8117 patients (74.8%) did not have a seizure disorder whereas 2736 (25.2%) had a seizure disorder. Bivariate analyses revealed that compared to patients without a seizure disorder, patients with a seizure disorder were at increased risk of developing surgical site infections, pneumonia, unplanned reintubation, urinary tract infection, postoperative transfusion, sepsis, extended operation time and length of stay and readmission (P < 0.05 for all). Following adjustment for patient demographics and comorbidities on multivariate analysis, there were no differences in any postoperative complications between pediatric patients with and without a seizure disorder. There were no differences in 30-day postoperative complications in patients with and without a seizure disorder. Due to potential decreased bone mineral density as an effect of antiepileptic drugs and the risk of femur fracture during surgery for hip dysplasia, pediatric patients with a seizure disorder should be closely monitored as they may be more susceptible to injury. Level of Evidence: III.

Department

Orthopaedic Surgery

Share

COinS