School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

PsychED: Improving Psychiatric Care in the ED

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Psychiatry/Mental Health

Keywords

psychiatry, emergency, hospital administration

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Study Objectives: To clearly identify and articulate what challenges and barriers to care currently exist in the management of psychiatric patients in the George Washington University Hospital Emergency Department. Furthermore, to determine what interventions and systematic changes would be helpful to address the above barriers. Methods: Use of a clear and concise survey that is distributed to all resident physicians that are rotating in the ED, and to all patients that have a psychiatric chief complaint. The specific questions we are asking include: “Do you feel you had adequate privacy while conducting your interview of the patient?”, “Are you satisfied with the physical space you were in while conducting your psychiatric interview?”, and “Have you had patients that were assessed for a psychiatric complaint complain about their ED experience?” Results: Proposal is currently pending IRB approval. Conclusion: Although there is currently no data yet to analyze, the potential ramifications of this study can change how psychiatric care is managed in the GW ED, such as creating a designated pod for psychiatric patients that provides privacy and minimizes over-stimulation by other patients.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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PsychED: Improving Psychiatric Care in the ED

Study Objectives: To clearly identify and articulate what challenges and barriers to care currently exist in the management of psychiatric patients in the George Washington University Hospital Emergency Department. Furthermore, to determine what interventions and systematic changes would be helpful to address the above barriers. Methods: Use of a clear and concise survey that is distributed to all resident physicians that are rotating in the ED, and to all patients that have a psychiatric chief complaint. The specific questions we are asking include: “Do you feel you had adequate privacy while conducting your interview of the patient?”, “Are you satisfied with the physical space you were in while conducting your psychiatric interview?”, and “Have you had patients that were assessed for a psychiatric complaint complain about their ED experience?” Results: Proposal is currently pending IRB approval. Conclusion: Although there is currently no data yet to analyze, the potential ramifications of this study can change how psychiatric care is managed in the GW ED, such as creating a designated pod for psychiatric patients that provides privacy and minimizes over-stimulation by other patients.