School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Longitudinal follow up of patients enrolled in the STOP Scleroderma Biorepository

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

Scleroderma, limited, diffuse

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate longitudinal outcomes and assess clinical differences in a cohort of patients with limited and diffuse scleroderma. This research was conducted via the STOP Scleroderma Study, a biospecimen and data repository approved by The George Washington University IRB (051427). All subjects gave written informed consent for longitudinal collection of their data. Of the 84 scleroderma patients enrolled in the STOP scleroderma study at the time of data lock, 37 fulfilled criteria for limited and 19 fulfilled criteria for diffuse scleroderma. Data were collected on demographics and baseline disease activity including skin score, scleroderma health assessment questionnaire disability index (SHAQ-DI), gastrointestinal (GI) score, physician global assessment, and the Medsger severity score. Data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism (version 7.0). There was no significant difference in age or gender in the diffuse and limited scleroderma cohorts (52.40 ± 12.72 years and 84% female) compared to (57.36 ± 14.48 years and 78% female), respectively (p = 0.21) and (p = 0.27); or in race (p = 0.41). Gastrointestinal involvement was similar in diffuse (0.48 ± 0.38) and limited scleroderma (0.50 ± 0.55, p = 0.90). As expected, the diffuse patients had higher Medsger Severity Score, (5.68 ± 2.58 compared to 3.20 ± 1.98 in limited, p = 0.0002); and SHAQ-DI, (0.87 ± 0.74 in diffuse compared 0.40 ± 0.51 in limited, p = 0.013). Physician reported assessments also demonstrated a significant difference in the two cohorts including physician global assessment diffuse (3.63 ± 1.46) and limited (2.08 ± 1.25) (p=0.0001); and skin score for diffuse (4.89 ± 1.73) and limited (2.03 ± 1.31) (p=.0045). In this cohort of patients with diffuse and limited scleroderma, there were a number of quantifiable patient outcomes that correlated with disease activity. Ongoing longitudinal follow up of this cohort is planned.

Open Access

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Longitudinal follow up of patients enrolled in the STOP Scleroderma Biorepository

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate longitudinal outcomes and assess clinical differences in a cohort of patients with limited and diffuse scleroderma. This research was conducted via the STOP Scleroderma Study, a biospecimen and data repository approved by The George Washington University IRB (051427). All subjects gave written informed consent for longitudinal collection of their data. Of the 84 scleroderma patients enrolled in the STOP scleroderma study at the time of data lock, 37 fulfilled criteria for limited and 19 fulfilled criteria for diffuse scleroderma. Data were collected on demographics and baseline disease activity including skin score, scleroderma health assessment questionnaire disability index (SHAQ-DI), gastrointestinal (GI) score, physician global assessment, and the Medsger severity score. Data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism (version 7.0). There was no significant difference in age or gender in the diffuse and limited scleroderma cohorts (52.40 ± 12.72 years and 84% female) compared to (57.36 ± 14.48 years and 78% female), respectively (p = 0.21) and (p = 0.27); or in race (p = 0.41). Gastrointestinal involvement was similar in diffuse (0.48 ± 0.38) and limited scleroderma (0.50 ± 0.55, p = 0.90). As expected, the diffuse patients had higher Medsger Severity Score, (5.68 ± 2.58 compared to 3.20 ± 1.98 in limited, p = 0.0002); and SHAQ-DI, (0.87 ± 0.74 in diffuse compared 0.40 ± 0.51 in limited, p = 0.013). Physician reported assessments also demonstrated a significant difference in the two cohorts including physician global assessment diffuse (3.63 ± 1.46) and limited (2.08 ± 1.25) (p=0.0001); and skin score for diffuse (4.89 ± 1.73) and limited (2.03 ± 1.31) (p=.0045). In this cohort of patients with diffuse and limited scleroderma, there were a number of quantifiable patient outcomes that correlated with disease activity. Ongoing longitudinal follow up of this cohort is planned.