School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Adult CPR Video Review Improves Resident Knowledge

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

education, resuscitation, CPR

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

For many residents, education to manage adult patients with cardiac arrest consists of ACLS, simulation cases, and observing healthcare providers. The latter can be variable and confusing for those without a solid foundation of knowledge. Feedback on performance often only occurs through real time debriefing sessions. Although these have shown improved cardiac arrest outcomes, they can be inconsistent and challenging to implement in a busy emergency department. An alternative or supplement to these forms of education is a longitudinal curriculum that provides private, individualized feedback to those who participated, as well as facilitated video reviews and lectures. Our objective was to implement a longitudinal curriculum based on real, videotaped, adult cardiac arrest cases, in order to improve resident knowledge. Three resuscitation bays were equipped with 24/7 video cameras, allowing capture of cardiac arrest cases. Cardiac arrest cases were then reviewed by two independent observers for Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) elements. The percentage of closed loop communication provided by the team leader was also measured. Standardized feedback was sent to all emergency department staff who were actively involved. Bi-monthly lectures during grand rounds included facilitator-guided video reviews for feedback and critique, followed by lectures. Pre- and post-intervention resident surveys assessed changes in knowledge. Funding: None. Surveys showed increased knowledge in the areas of ACLS and EtCO2 interpretation. Specifically, more residents chose to resume chest compressions after defibrillation (92 vs 83% in post- and pre-intervention surveys), correctly interpreted a low EtCO2 in the setting of a secured airway (100% vs 92%), and chose waveform capnography as the most reliable means of confirming endotracheal intubation (93% vs 64%). Anecdotally, residents identified individualized feedback and monthly lectures as valuable educational tools. The overwhelming response to this project has been positive in terms of resident satisfaction and education. We will continue to refine this longitudinal curriculum based on real, videotaped, adult cardiac arrest cases, through periodic resident assessments, continuing to collect and analyze patient outcome data, and more multidisciplinary involvement to identify areas of improvement.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Adult CPR Video Review Improves Resident Knowledge

For many residents, education to manage adult patients with cardiac arrest consists of ACLS, simulation cases, and observing healthcare providers. The latter can be variable and confusing for those without a solid foundation of knowledge. Feedback on performance often only occurs through real time debriefing sessions. Although these have shown improved cardiac arrest outcomes, they can be inconsistent and challenging to implement in a busy emergency department. An alternative or supplement to these forms of education is a longitudinal curriculum that provides private, individualized feedback to those who participated, as well as facilitated video reviews and lectures. Our objective was to implement a longitudinal curriculum based on real, videotaped, adult cardiac arrest cases, in order to improve resident knowledge. Three resuscitation bays were equipped with 24/7 video cameras, allowing capture of cardiac arrest cases. Cardiac arrest cases were then reviewed by two independent observers for Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) elements. The percentage of closed loop communication provided by the team leader was also measured. Standardized feedback was sent to all emergency department staff who were actively involved. Bi-monthly lectures during grand rounds included facilitator-guided video reviews for feedback and critique, followed by lectures. Pre- and post-intervention resident surveys assessed changes in knowledge. Funding: None. Surveys showed increased knowledge in the areas of ACLS and EtCO2 interpretation. Specifically, more residents chose to resume chest compressions after defibrillation (92 vs 83% in post- and pre-intervention surveys), correctly interpreted a low EtCO2 in the setting of a secured airway (100% vs 92%), and chose waveform capnography as the most reliable means of confirming endotracheal intubation (93% vs 64%). Anecdotally, residents identified individualized feedback and monthly lectures as valuable educational tools. The overwhelming response to this project has been positive in terms of resident satisfaction and education. We will continue to refine this longitudinal curriculum based on real, videotaped, adult cardiac arrest cases, through periodic resident assessments, continuing to collect and analyze patient outcome data, and more multidisciplinary involvement to identify areas of improvement.