School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Motivation, Threat, and Engagement Intensity in Cross-Disciplinary Health, Biomedical, Policy, and Education Teams: Pilot Analysis

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Health Sciences

Keywords

team science, motivation, mixed methods, cross-disciplinary health

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

This is a second phase mixed methods study that follows original research to test a psychometric tool, the Motivation Assessment for Team Readiness, Integration, and Collaboration (MATRICx), that assesses motivations and threats collaboration in health and biomedical teams. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between motivations, threats, degrees of engagement, and satisfaction of human need among team members working in established knowledge producing teams. A mixed methods comparative analysis study is being conducted. The qualitative method being used is semi-structured in-person interviews with individual members of knowledge producing teams. Following the interview, participants are asked to complete the MATRICx instrument, which utilizes quantitative methods. Data from the qualitative interviews will be triangulated with the quantitative survey data to support further interpretation of the meaning of the constructs of the MATRICx. An initial pilot of one teams qualitative data was completed in spring 2019. Based on preliminary analysis from coding of the initial four interviews, several findings can be deduced. A total of 85 codes were identified across one team. Three codes were identified across all four participants which included collaboration, role definition, and collegial. Prioritization, meeting schedules, and team identity were also frequently used codes across three of the four interviews. There were an additional 39 codes that were only used one time across the interviews. Additional analysis will be conducted to determine if these individual codes should remain independent or recoded through the iterative coding process. Since this study has only analyzed a subset of data, data collection and analysis will continue as the research team continues. Coding will continue as an iterative process following the methods outlines for the study to ensure intercoder reliability and continuation of thematic analysis as more data is analyzed. Once qualitative data is analyzed and quantitative data is collected, merging and integration of the data will occur.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Motivation, Threat, and Engagement Intensity in Cross-Disciplinary Health, Biomedical, Policy, and Education Teams: Pilot Analysis

This is a second phase mixed methods study that follows original research to test a psychometric tool, the Motivation Assessment for Team Readiness, Integration, and Collaboration (MATRICx), that assesses motivations and threats collaboration in health and biomedical teams. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between motivations, threats, degrees of engagement, and satisfaction of human need among team members working in established knowledge producing teams. A mixed methods comparative analysis study is being conducted. The qualitative method being used is semi-structured in-person interviews with individual members of knowledge producing teams. Following the interview, participants are asked to complete the MATRICx instrument, which utilizes quantitative methods. Data from the qualitative interviews will be triangulated with the quantitative survey data to support further interpretation of the meaning of the constructs of the MATRICx. An initial pilot of one teams qualitative data was completed in spring 2019. Based on preliminary analysis from coding of the initial four interviews, several findings can be deduced. A total of 85 codes were identified across one team. Three codes were identified across all four participants which included collaboration, role definition, and collegial. Prioritization, meeting schedules, and team identity were also frequently used codes across three of the four interviews. There were an additional 39 codes that were only used one time across the interviews. Additional analysis will be conducted to determine if these individual codes should remain independent or recoded through the iterative coding process. Since this study has only analyzed a subset of data, data collection and analysis will continue as the research team continues. Coding will continue as an iterative process following the methods outlines for the study to ensure intercoder reliability and continuation of thematic analysis as more data is analyzed. Once qualitative data is analyzed and quantitative data is collected, merging and integration of the data will occur.