School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

An Evaluation Guideline for a Service-Learning Curriculum Implemented in Medical Education

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

Service-Learning Curriculum, Medical Education, Evaluation Guideline

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Introduction The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of student community service activities on recall, comprehension, and application of learning objectives from the Clinical Public Health (CPH) aspects of the medical curriculum. CPH theme lectures and Summits were added to the medical curriculum at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (GW SMHS) in 2014. Many GW medical students perform community service during medical school through voluntary student activities such as The Healing Clinic, Whitman-Walker Health and activities of various student organizations. This project is being conducted in the context of an overall evaluation of the CPH curriculum. The specific objective of this project is to create an evaluation guideline for a Service-Learning Curriculum in medical education. This information will aid in the development of the pilot program because it will provide how the program will be evaluated on deliverables. Methods An initial retrospective analysis of existing literature specific to the area of service-learning curriculum within medical education was undertaken utilizing the following methods: PubMed, Himmelfarb, and Journal of Graduate Medical Education. A deficiency in this specific area was identified. Follow-up discussion with experts in the field provided an outline for critical information which was incorporated into guidelines by our team. Results The evaluation guideline was designed. From the literature and advice from experts, it was emphasized that a thorough evaluation would need both qualitative and quantitative data. In the context of a service-learning curriculum, this means reflections from students and community partners as well as evaluations of perception of success from faculty. In addition to this, quantitative data will be collected in the form of a survey with statements/questions to agree/disagree from a scale of 1 to 5. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first evaluation guideline of service-learning curriculum in medical education that will be released for universal use. The implications of this evaluation guideline are to be used to determine the success of the implemented service-learning curriculum for GW SMHS and other medical schools.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

An Evaluation Guideline for a Service-Learning Curriculum Implemented in Medical Education

Introduction The purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of student community service activities on recall, comprehension, and application of learning objectives from the Clinical Public Health (CPH) aspects of the medical curriculum. CPH theme lectures and Summits were added to the medical curriculum at The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences (GW SMHS) in 2014. Many GW medical students perform community service during medical school through voluntary student activities such as The Healing Clinic, Whitman-Walker Health and activities of various student organizations. This project is being conducted in the context of an overall evaluation of the CPH curriculum. The specific objective of this project is to create an evaluation guideline for a Service-Learning Curriculum in medical education. This information will aid in the development of the pilot program because it will provide how the program will be evaluated on deliverables. Methods An initial retrospective analysis of existing literature specific to the area of service-learning curriculum within medical education was undertaken utilizing the following methods: PubMed, Himmelfarb, and Journal of Graduate Medical Education. A deficiency in this specific area was identified. Follow-up discussion with experts in the field provided an outline for critical information which was incorporated into guidelines by our team. Results The evaluation guideline was designed. From the literature and advice from experts, it was emphasized that a thorough evaluation would need both qualitative and quantitative data. In the context of a service-learning curriculum, this means reflections from students and community partners as well as evaluations of perception of success from faculty. In addition to this, quantitative data will be collected in the form of a survey with statements/questions to agree/disagree from a scale of 1 to 5. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first evaluation guideline of service-learning curriculum in medical education that will be released for universal use. The implications of this evaluation guideline are to be used to determine the success of the implemented service-learning curriculum for GW SMHS and other medical schools.