School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Orthopaedic Injuries Related to the Segway® Personal Transporter™

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

Orthopaedic surgery, trauma, Segway,

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Introduction: As the Segway® personal transporter™ (SPT) gains popularity, observational studies have increasingly reported on injuries sustained by both SPT operators and bystanders. We investigated injuries related to SPT use over a five-year period. Methods: A prospective trauma database was retrospectively analyzed to identify patients admitted to the Emergency Department with injuries sustained as a result of a fall from a SPT at a Level I trauma institution in an urban setting. Pertinent patient information was compiled and injuries were cataloged and classified. The percentage of orthopaedic injuries were identified and stratified by gender, age, anatomic location and operative versus non-operative treatment. Results: Fifty-seven patient visits were identified. Of these, 40 (70%) suffered a fracture, dislocation, and/or tendon rupture, 18 (45%) of which required surgical intervention. The average patient age was 55.1 years, with 47 females and 10 males (P<0.01). Males who suffered injuries were older than females (62.4 vs. 53.6 years respectively, p=0.01), while no difference was observed in the percentage of males and females requiring surgery (30% male vs. 34.1% female, p=0.8). Twenty-one injuries (50%) were upper extremity injuries, 14 (33.3%) were lower extremity injuries, four (9.5%) were pelvic injuries, and three (7.1%) were injuries to the spine (p<0.01). Nine patients experienced multiple fractures, seven of which occurred at the same body location (i.e same upper extremity, same lower extremity), two occurred in different body locations. Length of stay for patients requiring surgical management for injuries was significantly longer than those managed non-operatively (4.6 days vs. 1.7 days, p<0.01). Conclusion: Patient visits to a Level I trauma institution were identified with injuries related to SPT use. A majority of patients injured using a SPT sustained a fracture and/or dislocation. Injured patients were of middle age, predominately women and often required surgical intervention.

Open Access

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Orthopaedic Injuries Related to the Segway® Personal Transporter™

Introduction: As the Segway® personal transporter™ (SPT) gains popularity, observational studies have increasingly reported on injuries sustained by both SPT operators and bystanders. We investigated injuries related to SPT use over a five-year period. Methods: A prospective trauma database was retrospectively analyzed to identify patients admitted to the Emergency Department with injuries sustained as a result of a fall from a SPT at a Level I trauma institution in an urban setting. Pertinent patient information was compiled and injuries were cataloged and classified. The percentage of orthopaedic injuries were identified and stratified by gender, age, anatomic location and operative versus non-operative treatment. Results: Fifty-seven patient visits were identified. Of these, 40 (70%) suffered a fracture, dislocation, and/or tendon rupture, 18 (45%) of which required surgical intervention. The average patient age was 55.1 years, with 47 females and 10 males (P<0.01). Males who suffered injuries were older than females (62.4 vs. 53.6 years respectively, p=0.01), while no difference was observed in the percentage of males and females requiring surgery (30% male vs. 34.1% female, p=0.8). Twenty-one injuries (50%) were upper extremity injuries, 14 (33.3%) were lower extremity injuries, four (9.5%) were pelvic injuries, and three (7.1%) were injuries to the spine (p<0.01). Nine patients experienced multiple fractures, seven of which occurred at the same body location (i.e same upper extremity, same lower extremity), two occurred in different body locations. Length of stay for patients requiring surgical management for injuries was significantly longer than those managed non-operatively (4.6 days vs. 1.7 days, p<0.01). Conclusion: Patient visits to a Level I trauma institution were identified with injuries related to SPT use. A majority of patients injured using a SPT sustained a fracture and/or dislocation. Injured patients were of middle age, predominately women and often required surgical intervention.