School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Utilization of Video Review Improves Resident Education and Patient Care in Cardiac Arrest

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Quality Improvement

Keywords

Cardiac Arrest, Emergency Medicine, Resident Education, Quality improvement

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

While simulated training with video is heavily studied, there is little data on the utilization of real case review of cardiac arrest resuscitation. This study investigates data collected from cardiac arrest resuscitations (n=47) to evaluate how a video review program may impact the quality of CPR provided. These cases were collected over a one-year period of video recording, chart review, and lecture curriculum. Videos were reviewed, and data collected including total resuscitation time, compression time, non-compression time (hands-off time). Educational sessions consisted of 1 hour lectures each month during dedicated education time for residents. During this time, a resuscitation was reviewed and teaching points were discussed as a group. Over the course of the one-year period, the percentage compression time increased significantly (Pearson's ρ=0.4277, p-value=0.003). Literature has identified compression time as a critical measure of the quality of CPR being provided, with a compression percentage >90% as ideal. This study shows that video review of real cases may improve the quality of care during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, although it remains to be seen if these improves are sustained after the study period.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Utilization of Video Review Improves Resident Education and Patient Care in Cardiac Arrest

While simulated training with video is heavily studied, there is little data on the utilization of real case review of cardiac arrest resuscitation. This study investigates data collected from cardiac arrest resuscitations (n=47) to evaluate how a video review program may impact the quality of CPR provided. These cases were collected over a one-year period of video recording, chart review, and lecture curriculum. Videos were reviewed, and data collected including total resuscitation time, compression time, non-compression time (hands-off time). Educational sessions consisted of 1 hour lectures each month during dedicated education time for residents. During this time, a resuscitation was reviewed and teaching points were discussed as a group. Over the course of the one-year period, the percentage compression time increased significantly (Pearson's ρ=0.4277, p-value=0.003). Literature has identified compression time as a critical measure of the quality of CPR being provided, with a compression percentage >90% as ideal. This study shows that video review of real cases may improve the quality of care during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, although it remains to be seen if these improves are sustained after the study period.