School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS of MANDIBULAR FRACTURES at a LEVEL I TRAUMA CENTER from 2008-2017

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Health Sciences

Keywords

mandible; fracture; otolaryngology; trauma I; urban

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Mandible fractures are a niche area within the world of otolaryngology. These fractures, along with other fracture sites, vary in occurrence based on the location along the mandible. For example, in rural areas, certain mandible fracture sites are more common than others, and motor vehicle accidents are the most common mechanism of action. Based on the Trauma Center type, multiple factors also can vary. The goal of this study was to determine the changes in specific variables at an urban Level I Trauma center during a ten-year (2008-2017) period including its title I re-verification in 2013. The variables analyzed consisted of patient demographics, fracture locations, etiology/ mechanism of injury, season of injury, treatment used, and insurance type. Overall, there was a steady rise in the number of mandible fractures over the ten-year period. While comparing the pre-verification and post- verification cohorts, there were significantly less condyle fractures, more 26-35 year olds, and more patients who were assaulted. Limitations to this study consisted of the lack of Hispanic sub-group within the hospital system and possible skewing of mechanism of injury (i.e. some patients may admit to an assault, while others may only admit to a fall). Overall, mandible fractures are multifactorial and certain factors may be dependent on geographical location.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS of MANDIBULAR FRACTURES at a LEVEL I TRAUMA CENTER from 2008-2017

Mandible fractures are a niche area within the world of otolaryngology. These fractures, along with other fracture sites, vary in occurrence based on the location along the mandible. For example, in rural areas, certain mandible fracture sites are more common than others, and motor vehicle accidents are the most common mechanism of action. Based on the Trauma Center type, multiple factors also can vary. The goal of this study was to determine the changes in specific variables at an urban Level I Trauma center during a ten-year (2008-2017) period including its title I re-verification in 2013. The variables analyzed consisted of patient demographics, fracture locations, etiology/ mechanism of injury, season of injury, treatment used, and insurance type. Overall, there was a steady rise in the number of mandible fractures over the ten-year period. While comparing the pre-verification and post- verification cohorts, there were significantly less condyle fractures, more 26-35 year olds, and more patients who were assaulted. Limitations to this study consisted of the lack of Hispanic sub-group within the hospital system and possible skewing of mechanism of injury (i.e. some patients may admit to an assault, while others may only admit to a fall). Overall, mandible fractures are multifactorial and certain factors may be dependent on geographical location.