School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV negative male

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

kaposi sarcoma, HIV-negative, HHV-8, category

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade vascular tumor associated with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. The tumor is caused by an excessive proliferation of spindle cells, thought to be of endothelial cell origin [19]. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) DNA has been identified in more than 90% of all types of KS lesions, suggesting a causative role. Kaposi sarcoma lesions present predominantly at mucocutaneous sites, but may involve all organs and anatomic locations. Four main types are described in the literature: classic, epidemic (AIDS-related), endemic, and immunosuppression-associated or transplant associated. Classic KS typically occurs in elderly men between 50-70 years old of Mediterranean or Eastern European origin, and rarely in men of Asian descent [19]. It consists of violaceous macules and papules with subsequent development of plaques and red-purple nodules. This type is rarely aggressive and is limited to the skin, lacking visceral involvement. Epidemic or AIDS-related KS occurs in patients with advanced HIV infection and is by far the most common and most aggressive presentation of KS today. The endemic/African KS entity usually occurs in black men who are HIV-seronegative. The clinical presentation of this subtype varies from slow-growing tumors to aggressive and fast-growing forms. This type typically occurs two to three decades earlier than the classic type. KS in the immunocompromised individual has been described in transplant patients and others receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Described below is a case of an elderly patient who presented with a form of KS that does not fit into any of the previously described epidemiological categories.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV negative male

Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a low-grade vascular tumor associated with Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. The tumor is caused by an excessive proliferation of spindle cells, thought to be of endothelial cell origin [19]. Human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) DNA has been identified in more than 90% of all types of KS lesions, suggesting a causative role. Kaposi sarcoma lesions present predominantly at mucocutaneous sites, but may involve all organs and anatomic locations. Four main types are described in the literature: classic, epidemic (AIDS-related), endemic, and immunosuppression-associated or transplant associated. Classic KS typically occurs in elderly men between 50-70 years old of Mediterranean or Eastern European origin, and rarely in men of Asian descent [19]. It consists of violaceous macules and papules with subsequent development of plaques and red-purple nodules. This type is rarely aggressive and is limited to the skin, lacking visceral involvement. Epidemic or AIDS-related KS occurs in patients with advanced HIV infection and is by far the most common and most aggressive presentation of KS today. The endemic/African KS entity usually occurs in black men who are HIV-seronegative. The clinical presentation of this subtype varies from slow-growing tumors to aggressive and fast-growing forms. This type typically occurs two to three decades earlier than the classic type. KS in the immunocompromised individual has been described in transplant patients and others receiving immunosuppressive therapy. Described below is a case of an elderly patient who presented with a form of KS that does not fit into any of the previously described epidemiological categories.