School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Racial Differences in Reasons for Stopping and Starting Physical Activity

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Exercise and Nutrition Sciences

Keywords

exercise, race, physical activity, goals, barriers

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Background: Only about half of American adults meet physical activity (PA) guidelines established by the CDC. One reason why so few Americans meet recommended levels of PA may be that individuals start a PA regime but then stop or have their routines interrupted. Therefore, one approach to improving PA may be to learn more about what leads individuals to stop an established routine and what prompts individuals to resume. One objective of the present study was to identify the most commonly mentioned reasons for stopping and starting back up PA routines. A second objective was to test whether there were racial differences in reasons individuals stop and resume their PA routines. Method: Participants (n = 711) were recruited from a primary care waiting room during September 2017. Participants completed a brief questionnaire that assessed variables related to the study objectives. Consistent with the study objectives, analyses focused on those who reported having established an exercise routine for at least two weeks in the past year (N = 434; female=59%; White =44%, African American=36%, Asian=6%, Hispanic=4%, or other race=7%). Frequencies were run to achieve study objective 1. Logistic regression analyses were run to test whether there were differences in the reasons given for stopping and starting back up PA between African American and White participants. Sample size for other racial groups were too small to make comparisons. Results: The most commonly listed reasons to stop PA were being busy (27%), health problems (26%), lacking motivation (18%), travel (16%), and work (15%). The most commonly listed reasons to resume PA were to manage weight (24%), gain health benefits (19%), improve fitness (8%), increase energy (6%), mediate mood (6%), and manage stress (5%). Logistic regression analyses comparing African American and White participants revealed no statistically significant differences in reasons for stopping PA. Regarding reasons for resuming PA, results showed that African American participants were almost twice as likely to start physical activity for weight management compared to White participants (Exp β = 1.97, 95% CI =1.10 to 3.51, p = 0.02). Conclusions: These data imply that disparities between African American and White adults with respect to PA is unlikely to be related to reasons why they stop PA. Results also imply that it may be worthwhile to investigate how to ensure that subjects who are motivated to start physical activity for weight management reasons are able to sustain PA.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Racial Differences in Reasons for Stopping and Starting Physical Activity

Background: Only about half of American adults meet physical activity (PA) guidelines established by the CDC. One reason why so few Americans meet recommended levels of PA may be that individuals start a PA regime but then stop or have their routines interrupted. Therefore, one approach to improving PA may be to learn more about what leads individuals to stop an established routine and what prompts individuals to resume. One objective of the present study was to identify the most commonly mentioned reasons for stopping and starting back up PA routines. A second objective was to test whether there were racial differences in reasons individuals stop and resume their PA routines. Method: Participants (n = 711) were recruited from a primary care waiting room during September 2017. Participants completed a brief questionnaire that assessed variables related to the study objectives. Consistent with the study objectives, analyses focused on those who reported having established an exercise routine for at least two weeks in the past year (N = 434; female=59%; White =44%, African American=36%, Asian=6%, Hispanic=4%, or other race=7%). Frequencies were run to achieve study objective 1. Logistic regression analyses were run to test whether there were differences in the reasons given for stopping and starting back up PA between African American and White participants. Sample size for other racial groups were too small to make comparisons. Results: The most commonly listed reasons to stop PA were being busy (27%), health problems (26%), lacking motivation (18%), travel (16%), and work (15%). The most commonly listed reasons to resume PA were to manage weight (24%), gain health benefits (19%), improve fitness (8%), increase energy (6%), mediate mood (6%), and manage stress (5%). Logistic regression analyses comparing African American and White participants revealed no statistically significant differences in reasons for stopping PA. Regarding reasons for resuming PA, results showed that African American participants were almost twice as likely to start physical activity for weight management compared to White participants (Exp β = 1.97, 95% CI =1.10 to 3.51, p = 0.02). Conclusions: These data imply that disparities between African American and White adults with respect to PA is unlikely to be related to reasons why they stop PA. Results also imply that it may be worthwhile to investigate how to ensure that subjects who are motivated to start physical activity for weight management reasons are able to sustain PA.