School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

The Forgotten Neuropeptide- Implications of Angiotensin II in PTSD

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Psychiatry/Mental Health

Keywords

PTSD, Angiotensin II, fear memory

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Current therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have limited efficacy, and alternative biochemical pathways need to be investigated. Growing research suggests that angiotensin II (AII), a peptide classically known to be involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, may also play a significant role in generalized emotional stress responses, memory, and cognition. Preclinical trials investigating the effects of AII on fear memory have produced conflicting results; several studies suggest that AII can improve fear memory acquisition and recall, while others demonstrate that it impairs these processes. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the time dependent and chemical mechanisms of fear memory in relation to AII and angiotensin receptor blockade. This literature review examines the methods and results of eight preclinical rodent trials involving fear memory acquisition, retention, and extinction in relation to AII. No trend or consensus were discovered regarding the modulation of fear memory by AII in the rodent studies that were selected. The results of this literature review indicate that the temporal mechanisms of AII modulation in fear memory are complex and likely involve multiple signaling pathways. More research with reproducible results and similar methodology need to be conducted to gain a better understanding of this pathway.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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The Forgotten Neuropeptide- Implications of Angiotensin II in PTSD

Current therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have limited efficacy, and alternative biochemical pathways need to be investigated. Growing research suggests that angiotensin II (AII), a peptide classically known to be involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, may also play a significant role in generalized emotional stress responses, memory, and cognition. Preclinical trials investigating the effects of AII on fear memory have produced conflicting results; several studies suggest that AII can improve fear memory acquisition and recall, while others demonstrate that it impairs these processes. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the time dependent and chemical mechanisms of fear memory in relation to AII and angiotensin receptor blockade. This literature review examines the methods and results of eight preclinical rodent trials involving fear memory acquisition, retention, and extinction in relation to AII. No trend or consensus were discovered regarding the modulation of fear memory by AII in the rodent studies that were selected. The results of this literature review indicate that the temporal mechanisms of AII modulation in fear memory are complex and likely involve multiple signaling pathways. More research with reproducible results and similar methodology need to be conducted to gain a better understanding of this pathway.