School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Ketamine Sedation for Acute Agitation in an Emergency Setting

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Health Sciences

Keywords

ketamine, sedation, agitation, emergency department, prehospital

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Ketamine may be a safe and effective pharmacological option for managing acute agitation in the emergency department (ED) and prehospital settings. The aim of this review was to summarize all available literature regarding the use of ketamine to sedate agitated patients in the ED and prehospital setting. As part of a systematic review, we queried multiple databases for any publications describing the use of ketamine to control agitation in either the ED or prehospital settings. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, data were extracted from each article using structured data sheets. Results of all studies were combined into a single table and a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate for efficacy and safety defined as successful sedation and no need for intubation. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Ten studies were in the prehospital setting and three in the ED which included a total of 674 patients. For the patients in whom adequate sedation was measured 79.0% were successfully sedated with ketamine. Compared to 10.2% of patients who were sedated with a control medication, 28.8% of the patients who were sedated with Ketamine required airway management. Overall, ketamine achieved adequate sedation in agitated patients treated in the ED and prehospital setting. However, a high percentage of patients required intubation following the use of ketamine. Future high-quality studies are needed to assess the effectiveness and safety of ketamine for this purpose.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Ketamine Sedation for Acute Agitation in an Emergency Setting

Ketamine may be a safe and effective pharmacological option for managing acute agitation in the emergency department (ED) and prehospital settings. The aim of this review was to summarize all available literature regarding the use of ketamine to sedate agitated patients in the ED and prehospital setting. As part of a systematic review, we queried multiple databases for any publications describing the use of ketamine to control agitation in either the ED or prehospital settings. After applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, data were extracted from each article using structured data sheets. Results of all studies were combined into a single table and a meta-analysis was performed to evaluate for efficacy and safety defined as successful sedation and no need for intubation. Thirteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Ten studies were in the prehospital setting and three in the ED which included a total of 674 patients. For the patients in whom adequate sedation was measured 79.0% were successfully sedated with ketamine. Compared to 10.2% of patients who were sedated with a control medication, 28.8% of the patients who were sedated with Ketamine required airway management. Overall, ketamine achieved adequate sedation in agitated patients treated in the ED and prehospital setting. However, a high percentage of patients required intubation following the use of ketamine. Future high-quality studies are needed to assess the effectiveness and safety of ketamine for this purpose.