School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Patient knowledge, utilized resources and clinical experiences regarding prenatal genetic screening and diagnostic testing.

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Women/Child Health

Keywords

women's health, genetic screening, patient education, prenatal screening

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Genetic screening and diagnostic testing during pregnancy has become increasingly common practice in preconception and prenatal visits. Prior research shows there is a lack of genetics knowledge, as well as understanding of screening and testing results by patients that may adversely impact their ability to make informed health decisions. The purpose of this survey study was to assess patient knowledge, clinical resources and utilized resources on genetic screening and diagnostic testing. Patients at a major urban OBGYN clinic were recruited for a voluntary survey. Descriptive statistics and chi square analysis of results are reported. A total of 466 of 500 patient surveys were completed, and 441 analyzed (88.2% response rate). Patients were on average 32 years old, 27 weeks pregnant, and most often reported a graduate degree level of education (47.4%). 38.1% reported screening and diagnostic testing in a prior pregnancy, and 84.6% reported conversations with providers during their current pregnancy. 47.8% reported meeting with a genetic counselor, and 56.7% reported having all their questions answered by genetic counselors. Over 75% of patients reported accurate knowledge of basic genetic statements, like “a gene is part of a chromosome;” however, when asked more complex statements regarding aneuploidy patients were less knowledgeable. If a patient reported discussing screening and diagnostic testing with their provider, they were significantly more likely to properly define screening and diagnostic testing (p < 0.001). Patients most often reported receiving pamphlets/brochures (66.7%) with less than 10% reporting any other resource; however, independently, patients most often accessed web links/video links (40.1%) and pamphlets/brochures (37.1%). Patients perceived all but one proposed educational tool (group classes) at least useful 80% or more of the time. Only 47.6% perceived group education classes as useful. Our findings suggest patients are having multiple discussions in office with providers, and this is having a significantly positive impact on patient knowledge and understanding. However, the discrepancy between educational resources distributed in clinic and what patients reported individually accessing, highlights an area of potential change to better provide resources to patients that are accurate in the media they desire. Patients also perceived all educational tools as useful, except for group classes, which may highlight the personalized needs and privacy associated with genetic screening and diagnostic testing. Future research should study whether implementing educational tools into the waiting room, and in clinic, would increase patient knowledge of genetic screening and diagnostic testing.

Open Access

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Patient knowledge, utilized resources and clinical experiences regarding prenatal genetic screening and diagnostic testing.

Genetic screening and diagnostic testing during pregnancy has become increasingly common practice in preconception and prenatal visits. Prior research shows there is a lack of genetics knowledge, as well as understanding of screening and testing results by patients that may adversely impact their ability to make informed health decisions. The purpose of this survey study was to assess patient knowledge, clinical resources and utilized resources on genetic screening and diagnostic testing. Patients at a major urban OBGYN clinic were recruited for a voluntary survey. Descriptive statistics and chi square analysis of results are reported. A total of 466 of 500 patient surveys were completed, and 441 analyzed (88.2% response rate). Patients were on average 32 years old, 27 weeks pregnant, and most often reported a graduate degree level of education (47.4%). 38.1% reported screening and diagnostic testing in a prior pregnancy, and 84.6% reported conversations with providers during their current pregnancy. 47.8% reported meeting with a genetic counselor, and 56.7% reported having all their questions answered by genetic counselors. Over 75% of patients reported accurate knowledge of basic genetic statements, like “a gene is part of a chromosome;” however, when asked more complex statements regarding aneuploidy patients were less knowledgeable. If a patient reported discussing screening and diagnostic testing with their provider, they were significantly more likely to properly define screening and diagnostic testing (p < 0.001). Patients most often reported receiving pamphlets/brochures (66.7%) with less than 10% reporting any other resource; however, independently, patients most often accessed web links/video links (40.1%) and pamphlets/brochures (37.1%). Patients perceived all but one proposed educational tool (group classes) at least useful 80% or more of the time. Only 47.6% perceived group education classes as useful. Our findings suggest patients are having multiple discussions in office with providers, and this is having a significantly positive impact on patient knowledge and understanding. However, the discrepancy between educational resources distributed in clinic and what patients reported individually accessing, highlights an area of potential change to better provide resources to patients that are accurate in the media they desire. Patients also perceived all educational tools as useful, except for group classes, which may highlight the personalized needs and privacy associated with genetic screening and diagnostic testing. Future research should study whether implementing educational tools into the waiting room, and in clinic, would increase patient knowledge of genetic screening and diagnostic testing.