School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

A Systematic Review of Gender Differences in METs After Cardiac Rehabilitation

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Research

Keywords

Gender, cardiac rehabilitation, cardiovascular disease, METs, Sex Factors

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Background: Cardiac rehabilitation programs employ a multipronged approach of exercise and lifestyle modifications to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors, improve physical function, and improving quality of life for patients with a wide range of cardiac pathologies. Prior research has demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation can benefit both men and women's exercise capacity. However, while systemic reviews have been conducted comparing compliance and referral rates between men and women to cardiac rehabilitation, none have assessed potential differences in functional capacity. Purpose: The purpose of this systemic review is to investigate the differences in outcomes between men and women after an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program as measured by metabolic equivalents (METs). Methods: Search strategies were developed using MeSH heading and free-text terms for four databases: PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL, and Cochrane. One author then eliminated any article duplicates and screened the remaining titles and abstracts. Papers were considered relevant if they compared outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation between men and women. For each study, two coauthors collected data using a standardized form. Data included answering if the study related to the PICO question, whether the study is observational or randomized, the population in the study, the cardiac rehabilitation intervention, any comparison intervention, the time points at which the outcomes were measured, and the functional exercise outcome measures metabolic equivalents (METs). Selection Criteria: Randomized or observational studies, published in English, full text article available. Papers were considered relevant if they compared outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation between men and women. Results: A Total of 9986 records identified from the search and 15 studies included in the final review. No eligible high level (RCT) study identified. All studies reported that both men and women benefit from cardiac rehabilitation as demonstrated by a universal increase in peak METs. Of the 15 studies included in the review, 13 showed a greater increase in peak METs in men and 2 showed a greater increase in peak METs in women. These differences tended to be small and not all of these differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The majority of studies reported that there were, on average, more male subjects participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs than females. Given the significant underrepresentation of women in these studies, it is difficult to speculate if differences in MET levels reported in these studies are a true representation of gender differences with respect to peak MET levels.

Open Access

1

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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A Systematic Review of Gender Differences in METs After Cardiac Rehabilitation

Background: Cardiac rehabilitation programs employ a multipronged approach of exercise and lifestyle modifications to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors, improve physical function, and improving quality of life for patients with a wide range of cardiac pathologies. Prior research has demonstrated that cardiac rehabilitation can benefit both men and women's exercise capacity. However, while systemic reviews have been conducted comparing compliance and referral rates between men and women to cardiac rehabilitation, none have assessed potential differences in functional capacity. Purpose: The purpose of this systemic review is to investigate the differences in outcomes between men and women after an intensive cardiac rehabilitation program as measured by metabolic equivalents (METs). Methods: Search strategies were developed using MeSH heading and free-text terms for four databases: PubMed, SCOPUS, and CINAHL, and Cochrane. One author then eliminated any article duplicates and screened the remaining titles and abstracts. Papers were considered relevant if they compared outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation between men and women. For each study, two coauthors collected data using a standardized form. Data included answering if the study related to the PICO question, whether the study is observational or randomized, the population in the study, the cardiac rehabilitation intervention, any comparison intervention, the time points at which the outcomes were measured, and the functional exercise outcome measures metabolic equivalents (METs). Selection Criteria: Randomized or observational studies, published in English, full text article available. Papers were considered relevant if they compared outcomes in cardiac rehabilitation between men and women. Results: A Total of 9986 records identified from the search and 15 studies included in the final review. No eligible high level (RCT) study identified. All studies reported that both men and women benefit from cardiac rehabilitation as demonstrated by a universal increase in peak METs. Of the 15 studies included in the review, 13 showed a greater increase in peak METs in men and 2 showed a greater increase in peak METs in women. These differences tended to be small and not all of these differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: The majority of studies reported that there were, on average, more male subjects participating in cardiac rehabilitation programs than females. Given the significant underrepresentation of women in these studies, it is difficult to speculate if differences in MET levels reported in these studies are a true representation of gender differences with respect to peak MET levels.