Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Understanding Black women’s psychosocial experiences with seeking treatment for uterine fibroids

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

uterine fibroids, qualitative research, health disparities, Black women

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Black women are disproportionately impacted by uterine fibroids and are more likely to undergo surgical treatment for fibroid management compared with other women. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 37 Black/African American women, to understand what factors shape Black women's treatment decisions, explore what information Black women desire during the decision-making process, and evaluate how discrimination based on intersections of race, class, and gender are featured in treatment-seeking experiences. Our preliminary findings suggest that patient-doctor interactions, social networks, and potential long-term health effects of fibroids influence Black women's treatment decisions. Our results also suggest that healthcare providers should consider the social and historical context of Black women's healthcare experiences when discussing fibroids care, remain transparent about the lack of scientific information on fibroids, and invite an open dialogue with patients regarding fibroid management.

Open Access

1

Comments

Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Understanding Black women’s psychosocial experiences with seeking treatment for uterine fibroids

Black women are disproportionately impacted by uterine fibroids and are more likely to undergo surgical treatment for fibroid management compared with other women. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews with 37 Black/African American women, to understand what factors shape Black women's treatment decisions, explore what information Black women desire during the decision-making process, and evaluate how discrimination based on intersections of race, class, and gender are featured in treatment-seeking experiences. Our preliminary findings suggest that patient-doctor interactions, social networks, and potential long-term health effects of fibroids influence Black women's treatment decisions. Our results also suggest that healthcare providers should consider the social and historical context of Black women's healthcare experiences when discussing fibroids care, remain transparent about the lack of scientific information on fibroids, and invite an open dialogue with patients regarding fibroid management.