Milken Institute School of Public Health Poster Presentations (Marvin Center & Video)

Title

Association between Diabetes, Obesity, and Aneuploidy among men in Washington DC.

Document Type

Poster

Abstract Category

Environmental and Occupational Health

Keywords

Diabetes, Obesity, Reproductive Health, Sperm Health

Publication Date

Spring 5-1-2019

Abstract

Background Currently, 422 million people are living with diabetes globally, with prevalence only increasing in the coming decade. In the US, diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) prevalence is expected to increase by 54% by the year 2030, especially among men, whose diabetes prevalence has more than doubled since 1980. Diabetes affects the male reproductive system, as glucose metabolism is an important component of spermatogenesis. Obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes, and prevalent among 73.7% of American men, can exacerbate these effects. Previous research has evaluated the impacts of diabetes and obesity on male sexual function, including semen quality; however, diabetes and obesity impacts on male reproduction, specifically chromosomal compliments known as aneuploidy, are not well understood. Objective This study will investigates the impacts of obesity and diabetes and their association with the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidy) among adult men living in Washington DC. Methods Men (N=132) between the ages of 18 and 55 were recruited from the three clinics within the Washington DC based GWU-MFA practice (In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF), Endocrinology, and General Internal Medicine). Eligible participants were recruited during routine appointments if they had a BMI ‚â• 30 or uncontrolled diabetes, as determined by a medically charted hemoglobin A1C value of ‚â• 7.0. Poisson regression was used to model the association between diabetes, obesity, and aneuploidy (SAS GEN-MOD Procedure). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results 13.6% of men in this cohort had a diagnosis of diabetes. Among these men, crude regression models have suggested that diabetic men had suggestively lower mean sperm motility compared to men without diabetes. In contrast, participants with abnormal semen concentrations, motility, and normal morphology did not differ by diabetes status. An expected negative relationship between diabetes, obesity and sex chromosome aneuploidy is expected to be seen. Conclusion This is the first epidemiological study to examine the relationship between diabetes and obesity among fathers, and its association with aneuploidy. It is the goal of this study to provide a better understanding of the underlying reproductive effects of these diseases.

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Presented at Research Days 2019.

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Association between Diabetes, Obesity, and Aneuploidy among men in Washington DC.

Background Currently, 422 million people are living with diabetes globally, with prevalence only increasing in the coming decade. In the US, diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) prevalence is expected to increase by 54% by the year 2030, especially among men, whose diabetes prevalence has more than doubled since 1980. Diabetes affects the male reproductive system, as glucose metabolism is an important component of spermatogenesis. Obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes, and prevalent among 73.7% of American men, can exacerbate these effects. Previous research has evaluated the impacts of diabetes and obesity on male sexual function, including semen quality; however, diabetes and obesity impacts on male reproduction, specifically chromosomal compliments known as aneuploidy, are not well understood. Objective This study will investigates the impacts of obesity and diabetes and their association with the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities (aneuploidy) among adult men living in Washington DC. Methods Men (N=132) between the ages of 18 and 55 were recruited from the three clinics within the Washington DC based GWU-MFA practice (In-Vitro Fertilization (IVF), Endocrinology, and General Internal Medicine). Eligible participants were recruited during routine appointments if they had a BMI ‚â• 30 or uncontrolled diabetes, as determined by a medically charted hemoglobin A1C value of ‚â• 7.0. Poisson regression was used to model the association between diabetes, obesity, and aneuploidy (SAS GEN-MOD Procedure). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results 13.6% of men in this cohort had a diagnosis of diabetes. Among these men, crude regression models have suggested that diabetic men had suggestively lower mean sperm motility compared to men without diabetes. In contrast, participants with abnormal semen concentrations, motility, and normal morphology did not differ by diabetes status. An expected negative relationship between diabetes, obesity and sex chromosome aneuploidy is expected to be seen. Conclusion This is the first epidemiological study to examine the relationship between diabetes and obesity among fathers, and its association with aneuploidy. It is the goal of this study to provide a better understanding of the underlying reproductive effects of these diseases.