School of Nursing Poster Presentations

Title

Variables Related to Colon Cancer Screening Rates Among Male Veterans

Poster Number

358

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Doctoral

Abstract Category

Cancer/Oncology

Keywords

colonoscopy screening, colon cancer, male Veterans

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background/Problem

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide (Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ), 2013; Center for Disease Control & Prevention Colon Cancer (CDC), 2014).

CRC has been identified by the CDC as a preventable cancer. The CDC recommends colon cancer screening colonoscopy beginning at age 50 and every 10 years thereafter. The purpose of this study was to explore and compare differences in variables associated with the rate of CRC screening among male Veterans and age, race, income, educational level and marital status.

Methods

An exploratory-comparative secondary data analysis design addressed study questions, using data from the 2014 Behavioral risk factor surveillance system (BRFSS). A Chi-Squared statistical analysis method was used to study the relationship between each independent variable and the dependent variable. An alpha level was set at 0.01 for all data analysis.

Results

Data suggests a significant relationship exists between variables identified, showing an increased rate of Veterans receiving recommended CRC in specified time interval. Veterans were more likely than Non-Veterans to receive recommended CRC screening.

Among Veterans, people who were 65-74 years were more likely to have had CRC screening then people who were 50-64 years (74.2% vs 68.9%). Veterans who were white had a higher rate (70.1%) of meeting the CRC recommendations than Black Veterans (68.3%); Hispanic Veterans had the lowest rate of meeting CRC recommendations.

Higher income and higher educational level was related to higher rate of meeting CRC. Veterans who were married or living with a partner, also had a higher rate of meeting CRC recommendations.

Conclusions:

There was a gap in the research studying male Veterans and how they choose to have a colonoscopy exam when influenced by identified variables. Further research, to include female Veterans is recommended. Providers in the VHA should provide targeted services to Veterans who have low social economic status to improve their CRC screening among all Veterans served.

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Variables Related to Colon Cancer Screening Rates Among Male Veterans

Background/Problem

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide (Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality (AHRQ), 2013; Center for Disease Control & Prevention Colon Cancer (CDC), 2014).

CRC has been identified by the CDC as a preventable cancer. The CDC recommends colon cancer screening colonoscopy beginning at age 50 and every 10 years thereafter. The purpose of this study was to explore and compare differences in variables associated with the rate of CRC screening among male Veterans and age, race, income, educational level and marital status.

Methods

An exploratory-comparative secondary data analysis design addressed study questions, using data from the 2014 Behavioral risk factor surveillance system (BRFSS). A Chi-Squared statistical analysis method was used to study the relationship between each independent variable and the dependent variable. An alpha level was set at 0.01 for all data analysis.

Results

Data suggests a significant relationship exists between variables identified, showing an increased rate of Veterans receiving recommended CRC in specified time interval. Veterans were more likely than Non-Veterans to receive recommended CRC screening.

Among Veterans, people who were 65-74 years were more likely to have had CRC screening then people who were 50-64 years (74.2% vs 68.9%). Veterans who were white had a higher rate (70.1%) of meeting the CRC recommendations than Black Veterans (68.3%); Hispanic Veterans had the lowest rate of meeting CRC recommendations.

Higher income and higher educational level was related to higher rate of meeting CRC. Veterans who were married or living with a partner, also had a higher rate of meeting CRC recommendations.

Conclusions:

There was a gap in the research studying male Veterans and how they choose to have a colonoscopy exam when influenced by identified variables. Further research, to include female Veterans is recommended. Providers in the VHA should provide targeted services to Veterans who have low social economic status to improve their CRC screening among all Veterans served.