School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Validation of Bioelectric Impedance Cardiography for Measuring Diastolic Cardiac Function.

Poster Number

140

Document Type

Poster

Status

Graduate Student - Doctoral

Abstract Category

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Research

Keywords

Diastolic Cardiac Function, Bioelectric Impedance Cardiography

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Purpose: To validate the use of bioelectric impedance cardiography (ZCG) for assessing diastolic cardiac function (DF). Current methods for measuring DF are expensive and often impractical when attempting to assess DF during physical activity or during exercise performed in an upright position. If validated, ZCG may provide a cheaper and more versatile alternative for assessing DF.

Methods: Recreationally active participants ages 18-45 years old who were free of cardiovascular disease participated in the study. During a single visit, participants received a standard resting clinical echocardiogram followed by an exercise stress echocardiogram employing a treadmill. DF was measured at rest and during an elevated heart rate during the post-exercise stress test cool-down period, respectively. All echocardiogram DF measurements were obtained in a side-lying or prone positon. DF variables obtained from echocardiography were the early to late peak ventricular filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) and early peak filling velocity to early diastolic mitral annular velocity ratio (E/E' ratio). The ZCG device was employed to measure DF concurrently during both echocardiogram assessments for each participant. The early diastolic filling ratio (EDFR) obtained via the ZCG is reported by the device manufacturer to be analogous to the E/A ratio obtained via echocardiography.

Results: To date, 16 subjects have been enrolled in this ongoing study. Results from a Pearson correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the EDFR and the E/A ratio (r= 0.467, p = 0.009). No significant correlation was observed between the EDFR and E/E’.

Conclusions: These preliminary findings of our ongoing study suggest that the ZCG device may be a valid tool for assessing some components of DF. ZCG is less expensive than echocardiography and does not require a trained technician, and can assess global cardiac cycle function during a variety of physical activities in any body position. Recent studies demonstrate that diastolic dysfunction often precedes systolic dysfunction, and is an independent predictor of mortality in some disease models. Our preliminary findings suggest that ZCG may eventually play a role as a less expensive tool to screen for diastolic dysfunction in diverse clinical settings, potentially removing some barriers to detecting early cardiac abnormalities.

Funding source: GWU SMHS Emerging Scholars in Health Science Pilot Grant, Pl: Woolstenhulme

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Validation of Bioelectric Impedance Cardiography for Measuring Diastolic Cardiac Function.

Purpose: To validate the use of bioelectric impedance cardiography (ZCG) for assessing diastolic cardiac function (DF). Current methods for measuring DF are expensive and often impractical when attempting to assess DF during physical activity or during exercise performed in an upright position. If validated, ZCG may provide a cheaper and more versatile alternative for assessing DF.

Methods: Recreationally active participants ages 18-45 years old who were free of cardiovascular disease participated in the study. During a single visit, participants received a standard resting clinical echocardiogram followed by an exercise stress echocardiogram employing a treadmill. DF was measured at rest and during an elevated heart rate during the post-exercise stress test cool-down period, respectively. All echocardiogram DF measurements were obtained in a side-lying or prone positon. DF variables obtained from echocardiography were the early to late peak ventricular filling velocity ratio (E/A ratio) and early peak filling velocity to early diastolic mitral annular velocity ratio (E/E' ratio). The ZCG device was employed to measure DF concurrently during both echocardiogram assessments for each participant. The early diastolic filling ratio (EDFR) obtained via the ZCG is reported by the device manufacturer to be analogous to the E/A ratio obtained via echocardiography.

Results: To date, 16 subjects have been enrolled in this ongoing study. Results from a Pearson correlation analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between the EDFR and the E/A ratio (r= 0.467, p = 0.009). No significant correlation was observed between the EDFR and E/E’.

Conclusions: These preliminary findings of our ongoing study suggest that the ZCG device may be a valid tool for assessing some components of DF. ZCG is less expensive than echocardiography and does not require a trained technician, and can assess global cardiac cycle function during a variety of physical activities in any body position. Recent studies demonstrate that diastolic dysfunction often precedes systolic dysfunction, and is an independent predictor of mortality in some disease models. Our preliminary findings suggest that ZCG may eventually play a role as a less expensive tool to screen for diastolic dysfunction in diverse clinical settings, potentially removing some barriers to detecting early cardiac abnormalities.

Funding source: GWU SMHS Emerging Scholars in Health Science Pilot Grant, Pl: Woolstenhulme