School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Efficacy of Outpatient Ketamine Infusions in Different Chronic Pain Conditions

Poster Number

179

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

ketamine, chronic pain, anesthesia, neuropathic pain

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Ketamine, an NMDA antagonist, has shown to be effective in chronic pain relief (1, 2, 3). This study seeks to examine the efficacy of outpatient ketamine infusions in patients with various chronic pain diagnoses.

We examined data on patients undergoing ketamine infusions, subdividing patients based on their pain diagnosis into nonexclusive categories: neuropathic pain, generalized pain, chronic postoperative pain, and chronic pain with a psychiatric diagnosis. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory prior to 1-day or 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions and again 2-4 weeks after the infusions. We measured pain scores pre and post infusions and on follow up visit.

A random effects mixed model was used to test the time effect for pain and accounted for within-subject autocorrelation of the pain scores.

There were 224 patients: 143 patients with neuropathic pain (64%), 49 with generalized pain (22%), 80 with chronic post-op pain (36%), and 63 with psychiatric diagnoses (28%). There was a significant drop in mean pain level from pre to post infusion (p<.0001) for all diagnoses, with the mean pain level dropping from 7.6 (95% confidence interval 6.8 to 8.5) to 6.8 (95% ci 6.0 to 7.7) after adjusting for covariates.

Outpatient ketamine infusions significantly improved outcome measures in patients with each of the above diagnosis groups. Closer analysis shows that improvement in various quality of life measures differed amongst chronic pain conditions.

Further study with larger sample groups may help elucidate ketamine’s broad therapeutic effect in treating chronic pain.

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Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Efficacy of Outpatient Ketamine Infusions in Different Chronic Pain Conditions

Ketamine, an NMDA antagonist, has shown to be effective in chronic pain relief (1, 2, 3). This study seeks to examine the efficacy of outpatient ketamine infusions in patients with various chronic pain diagnoses.

We examined data on patients undergoing ketamine infusions, subdividing patients based on their pain diagnosis into nonexclusive categories: neuropathic pain, generalized pain, chronic postoperative pain, and chronic pain with a psychiatric diagnosis. Patients completed the Brief Pain Inventory prior to 1-day or 3-day outpatient ketamine infusions and again 2-4 weeks after the infusions. We measured pain scores pre and post infusions and on follow up visit.

A random effects mixed model was used to test the time effect for pain and accounted for within-subject autocorrelation of the pain scores.

There were 224 patients: 143 patients with neuropathic pain (64%), 49 with generalized pain (22%), 80 with chronic post-op pain (36%), and 63 with psychiatric diagnoses (28%). There was a significant drop in mean pain level from pre to post infusion (p<.0001) for all diagnoses, with the mean pain level dropping from 7.6 (95% confidence interval 6.8 to 8.5) to 6.8 (95% ci 6.0 to 7.7) after adjusting for covariates.

Outpatient ketamine infusions significantly improved outcome measures in patients with each of the above diagnosis groups. Closer analysis shows that improvement in various quality of life measures differed amongst chronic pain conditions.

Further study with larger sample groups may help elucidate ketamine’s broad therapeutic effect in treating chronic pain.