School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Assessing recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation using inflammatory biomarkers

Poster Number

145

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Research

Keywords

Atrial Fibrillation, Inflammation, Cardiology, Biomarkers

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition where a group of conductile cells in the atria begin to signal independently of the pacemaking cells of the heart. This leads to a rapidly irregular heart rate resulting in an uncoordinated flow of blood through the heart, which increases the risk of life-threatening thromboembolic events. Patients who are candidates for surgery are treated via catheter ablation targeting the aberrant group of cells which cuts the circuit and restores a normal sinus rhythm. About 30% of patients that undergo this treatment have their AF successfully abolished, only for it to reoccur. We aimed to assess the role of inflammatory biomarkers and how they predict the reoccurrence of AF. We recruited 10 patients with AF and isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) before, one week after, and one month after the catheter ablation. PBMCs were then cultured for 24 hours and their secretions collected and analyzed using ELISA and Multiplex-luminex kits. The future direction of the study is to use a comprehensive panel of biomarkers in order to identify inflammation-dependent AF and to predict AF recurrence in patients post-ablation.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Assessing recurrence of Atrial Fibrillation using inflammatory biomarkers

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a condition where a group of conductile cells in the atria begin to signal independently of the pacemaking cells of the heart. This leads to a rapidly irregular heart rate resulting in an uncoordinated flow of blood through the heart, which increases the risk of life-threatening thromboembolic events. Patients who are candidates for surgery are treated via catheter ablation targeting the aberrant group of cells which cuts the circuit and restores a normal sinus rhythm. About 30% of patients that undergo this treatment have their AF successfully abolished, only for it to reoccur. We aimed to assess the role of inflammatory biomarkers and how they predict the reoccurrence of AF. We recruited 10 patients with AF and isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) before, one week after, and one month after the catheter ablation. PBMCs were then cultured for 24 hours and their secretions collected and analyzed using ELISA and Multiplex-luminex kits. The future direction of the study is to use a comprehensive panel of biomarkers in order to identify inflammation-dependent AF and to predict AF recurrence in patients post-ablation.