School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Outcomes of Paradoxical Vocal Cord Motion Diagnosed in Childhood

Poster Number

212

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

otolaryngology, paediatrics

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Paradoxical vocal cord motion (PVCM) is a condition where the vocal cords inappropriately and intermittently adduct during inspiration. In the pediatric population, PVCM is an affliction of adolescents. A variety of etiologies including laryngeal hyper-responsiveness, sensory defects, psychogenic origins, irritant exposure and more have been suggested however, the exact etiology of PVCM is not well understood. This arguably contributes to the prolonged time between symptom onset and definitive diagnosis. While the current mainstays in PVCM treatment include speech therapy, biofeedback and patient education, there remain key unanswered questions including: do patients continue to experience episodes of dysfunction after achieving early control with biofeedback, do patients still practice vocal cord relaxation techniques, and does PVCM affect participants' quality of life? This cross sectional study assesses the outcomes for patients diagnosed with PVCM at Children’s National Health Center over a 10-year period. Chart review identified fifty-two patients with PVCM, these patients were then given a REDcap-based survey assessing participants’ time from symptom onset to diagnosis, treatments recommended to them, their continued use of treatments, persistence of symptoms and impact on quality of life. Data collection and analysis is ongoing.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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Outcomes of Paradoxical Vocal Cord Motion Diagnosed in Childhood

Paradoxical vocal cord motion (PVCM) is a condition where the vocal cords inappropriately and intermittently adduct during inspiration. In the pediatric population, PVCM is an affliction of adolescents. A variety of etiologies including laryngeal hyper-responsiveness, sensory defects, psychogenic origins, irritant exposure and more have been suggested however, the exact etiology of PVCM is not well understood. This arguably contributes to the prolonged time between symptom onset and definitive diagnosis. While the current mainstays in PVCM treatment include speech therapy, biofeedback and patient education, there remain key unanswered questions including: do patients continue to experience episodes of dysfunction after achieving early control with biofeedback, do patients still practice vocal cord relaxation techniques, and does PVCM affect participants' quality of life? This cross sectional study assesses the outcomes for patients diagnosed with PVCM at Children’s National Health Center over a 10-year period. Chart review identified fifty-two patients with PVCM, these patients were then given a REDcap-based survey assessing participants’ time from symptom onset to diagnosis, treatments recommended to them, their continued use of treatments, persistence of symptoms and impact on quality of life. Data collection and analysis is ongoing.