School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

An Alternative Measurement of Central Obesity: Abdominobesity Index (ABI)

Poster Number

138

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Obesity

Keywords

Obesity, Measurement, Central Obesity, Visceral Fat, Abdominal Cavity

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world. Approximately 35.0% of men and 40.4% of women in the United States were considered obese in 2013-2014. Obesity, and more specifically central obesity, is associated with a myriad of health problems. Central obesity, also known as abdominal obesity, refers to an excess fat deposit around and within the abdominal cavity. Central obesity has been linked to hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and other health concerns.

We have established the concept of Abdominobesity Index (ABI), a new measurement to be used in quantifying a person’s central obesity. We propose such a new measurement because obesity rates continue to rise in our country and various places around the world. To best solve a problem, one must understand it, in this case by measuring it as accurately as possible. Therefore, we propose this new measurement as a supplement to those that already exist for measuring obesity, such as Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist to Hip Ratio (WHR). Our measurement is an important supplement because it specifically focuses on quantifying a person’s degree of central obesity. ABI departs from previous measurements in that it specifically targets the abdominal fat by comparing abdominal circumference with chest circumference. We set forth the formula for our new ABI measurement along with a discussion of the preliminary data analysis that demonstrates the utility of ABI as a measurement distinct from BMI. In the future, we hope to conduct further studies that also track patient outcomes. In conjunction with other obesity measurements, we believe ABI will help advance further obesity research and improve risk stratification in obese patients.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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An Alternative Measurement of Central Obesity: Abdominobesity Index (ABI)

Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world. Approximately 35.0% of men and 40.4% of women in the United States were considered obese in 2013-2014. Obesity, and more specifically central obesity, is associated with a myriad of health problems. Central obesity, also known as abdominal obesity, refers to an excess fat deposit around and within the abdominal cavity. Central obesity has been linked to hypercholesterolemia, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, and other health concerns.

We have established the concept of Abdominobesity Index (ABI), a new measurement to be used in quantifying a person’s central obesity. We propose such a new measurement because obesity rates continue to rise in our country and various places around the world. To best solve a problem, one must understand it, in this case by measuring it as accurately as possible. Therefore, we propose this new measurement as a supplement to those that already exist for measuring obesity, such as Body Mass Index (BMI) and Waist to Hip Ratio (WHR). Our measurement is an important supplement because it specifically focuses on quantifying a person’s degree of central obesity. ABI departs from previous measurements in that it specifically targets the abdominal fat by comparing abdominal circumference with chest circumference. We set forth the formula for our new ABI measurement along with a discussion of the preliminary data analysis that demonstrates the utility of ABI as a measurement distinct from BMI. In the future, we hope to conduct further studies that also track patient outcomes. In conjunction with other obesity measurements, we believe ABI will help advance further obesity research and improve risk stratification in obese patients.