School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Utilization of and Attitudes towards Free Open Access Medical Education Resources and Social Media among Emergency Medicine Physicians in India

Poster Number

239

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Global Health

Keywords

International Emergency medicine, FOAMed, WhatsApp, Emergency Medicine, India

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background Emergency Medicine (EM) is still in its early development in much of the world, including India. Educational tools such as Free Open Access Medical Education (FOAMed) resources and social media are being used to augment learning and aid in clinical decision making in EM settings including the United States. However the utility in other settings is less well understood. The aim of the study was to characterize current usage and attitudes toward FOAMed and social media among EM physicians in India. Methods We used an online survey and in-person semi-structured interviews to collect data regarding attitudes toward and usage of FOAMed and social media. Survey invitations were sent via email to current residents and faculty. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in-person with a convenience sample of faculty and residents. Survey data was analyzed using STATA 11.0 to calculate mean responses with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Interview content was analyzed using rapid assessment methodology. Results 91 respondents completed the survey. The most commonly used resources for medical education were YouTube (70.3%, 95% CI 60.8-79.9%), WhatsApp (59.3% 95% CI 49.1-69.6%), and Facebook (36.3% (95% CI 26.2- 46.3%). These resources are reportedly used at least daily or numerous times per week by almost half of all respondents. Approximately 70% of respondents reported at least one barrier to the usage of FOAMed or social media, including cost (28.6% [95%CI 19.1-38.0%]), blocked websites (19.8% [95%CI 11.4-28.1%]) and internet connectivity (18.7% [95% CI 10.5-26.8%]). 103 interviews were conducted. Common themes included the ease of sharing knowledge and clinical information via social media. Many respondents reported using WhatsApp to expedite patient care when consultants were not readily available, and to answer clinical questions in real time. Respondents also described using social media to expand learning in unusual cases. Advanced residents and consultants were more likely to describe importance of FOAMed resources as adjuncts to basic learning tool such as textbooks. Conclusions Most EM trainees and faculty in India are aware that Free Open Access Medical Education resources exist, though familiarity with the term was variable. Trainees expressed a need for resources specifically focused on India or Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs).

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Utilization of and Attitudes towards Free Open Access Medical Education Resources and Social Media among Emergency Medicine Physicians in India

Background Emergency Medicine (EM) is still in its early development in much of the world, including India. Educational tools such as Free Open Access Medical Education (FOAMed) resources and social media are being used to augment learning and aid in clinical decision making in EM settings including the United States. However the utility in other settings is less well understood. The aim of the study was to characterize current usage and attitudes toward FOAMed and social media among EM physicians in India. Methods We used an online survey and in-person semi-structured interviews to collect data regarding attitudes toward and usage of FOAMed and social media. Survey invitations were sent via email to current residents and faculty. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in-person with a convenience sample of faculty and residents. Survey data was analyzed using STATA 11.0 to calculate mean responses with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Interview content was analyzed using rapid assessment methodology. Results 91 respondents completed the survey. The most commonly used resources for medical education were YouTube (70.3%, 95% CI 60.8-79.9%), WhatsApp (59.3% 95% CI 49.1-69.6%), and Facebook (36.3% (95% CI 26.2- 46.3%). These resources are reportedly used at least daily or numerous times per week by almost half of all respondents. Approximately 70% of respondents reported at least one barrier to the usage of FOAMed or social media, including cost (28.6% [95%CI 19.1-38.0%]), blocked websites (19.8% [95%CI 11.4-28.1%]) and internet connectivity (18.7% [95% CI 10.5-26.8%]). 103 interviews were conducted. Common themes included the ease of sharing knowledge and clinical information via social media. Many respondents reported using WhatsApp to expedite patient care when consultants were not readily available, and to answer clinical questions in real time. Respondents also described using social media to expand learning in unusual cases. Advanced residents and consultants were more likely to describe importance of FOAMed resources as adjuncts to basic learning tool such as textbooks. Conclusions Most EM trainees and faculty in India are aware that Free Open Access Medical Education resources exist, though familiarity with the term was variable. Trainees expressed a need for resources specifically focused on India or Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs).