School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Diverse Patient Perceptions in Psoriasis

Poster Number

152

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Resident

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

psoriasis, diversity,

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Caucasians are the major population of patients with psoriasis in European countries and the U.S. However, several studies have shown minority populations may suffer from worse quality of life (QoL) and more severe disease. The paucity of psoriasis research in diverse populations as well as sociocultural factors, including access to care, different perceptions of disease, and religious influences, may be the cause of this disparity. No known studies have attempted to assess the racial/ethnic differences and sociocultural variations in patient experiences of psoriasis. Furthermore, no tool exists to measure these differences in patient perceptions.

Objective: To conduct focus groups containing psoriasis patients of diverse backgrounds to identify racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious differences in patient perceptions of psoriasis care, treatment, and disease course.

Methods: Between May 2017 and July 2017, we conducted focus groups of diverse patients with psoriasis from the dermatology clinics at the George Washington Medical Faculty Associates. Patients were asked questions regarding their identity, personal and societal influences on personal perception of their psoriasis, and the societal factors (such as culture, religion, race, and sexuality) which influence their diverse perceptions.

Results and Conclusion: A total of 13 psoriasis patients participated in the focus groups. Patients considered ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and profession as strong definers of their identity. Majority of participants identified that knowing other people with psoriasis of the same ethnicity helped ease anxiety due to psoriasis. Patients of minority origin commonly stated that medical issues were not spoken about in their community, causing them to feel isolated. For patients identifying with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community, aesthetics was noted to be an important component of the LGBTQ community, which caused greater concern about psoriasis flares in these patients. Patients reported the appearance and the opinions of other people as the most bothersome aspects of their psoriasis. Patients also often felt self-conscious about their skin in their personal and work lives. However, support of family members helped alleviate self-consciousness. Participants wanted better education about psoriasis tailored to their identity. Community education would also benefit the LGBTQ community as peers mistook psoriasis plaques to be related to HIV. Using this data, we are now developing and validating a clinical survey instrument that can be used in research to assess diverse differences in patient perceptions of psoriasis.

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Diverse Patient Perceptions in Psoriasis

Background: Caucasians are the major population of patients with psoriasis in European countries and the U.S. However, several studies have shown minority populations may suffer from worse quality of life (QoL) and more severe disease. The paucity of psoriasis research in diverse populations as well as sociocultural factors, including access to care, different perceptions of disease, and religious influences, may be the cause of this disparity. No known studies have attempted to assess the racial/ethnic differences and sociocultural variations in patient experiences of psoriasis. Furthermore, no tool exists to measure these differences in patient perceptions.

Objective: To conduct focus groups containing psoriasis patients of diverse backgrounds to identify racial, ethnic, cultural, and religious differences in patient perceptions of psoriasis care, treatment, and disease course.

Methods: Between May 2017 and July 2017, we conducted focus groups of diverse patients with psoriasis from the dermatology clinics at the George Washington Medical Faculty Associates. Patients were asked questions regarding their identity, personal and societal influences on personal perception of their psoriasis, and the societal factors (such as culture, religion, race, and sexuality) which influence their diverse perceptions.

Results and Conclusion: A total of 13 psoriasis patients participated in the focus groups. Patients considered ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and profession as strong definers of their identity. Majority of participants identified that knowing other people with psoriasis of the same ethnicity helped ease anxiety due to psoriasis. Patients of minority origin commonly stated that medical issues were not spoken about in their community, causing them to feel isolated. For patients identifying with the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) community, aesthetics was noted to be an important component of the LGBTQ community, which caused greater concern about psoriasis flares in these patients. Patients reported the appearance and the opinions of other people as the most bothersome aspects of their psoriasis. Patients also often felt self-conscious about their skin in their personal and work lives. However, support of family members helped alleviate self-consciousness. Participants wanted better education about psoriasis tailored to their identity. Community education would also benefit the LGBTQ community as peers mistook psoriasis plaques to be related to HIV. Using this data, we are now developing and validating a clinical survey instrument that can be used in research to assess diverse differences in patient perceptions of psoriasis.