School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Evaluation of the current level of incorporation of an integrative medicine curriculum into national physical medicine & rehabilitation residency training

Poster Number

229

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

Integrative Medicine, Physical Medicine; Rehabilitation, Medical Postgraduate Education

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

The most recently released American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines on treatment of acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain (LBP) suggest a departure from standard medical therapy and an emphasis on integrative medicine (IM) modalities. The guidelines state that non-drug therapies should be used by physicians and patients for acute and subacute LBP. This includes superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation. For chronic LBP, the ACP recommends supplementation of non-drug therapy with exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based exercise, tai chi, yoga, and more. The object of this study is to determine if and how integrative medicine modalities are being incorporated into Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R) residency training across the country. Data was gathered through email-based outreach to the eighty-seven accredited PM&R residency programs as listed on the AMA FREIDA database. At this point in the research, responses have been obtained from just over 50% of the programs. A preliminary grading system has been established in an attempt to standardize the responses. A grade of “3” was given to programs in which residents receive non-voluntary, organized exposure to IM. A grade of “2” was given to programs in which residents receive voluntary and/or informal exposure to IM, and a grade of “1” was given to programs in which residents receive no official exposure to IM but faculty practice may include some IM modalities. Of the responses received to date, the average grade across all eighty-seven residency programs was found to be roughly 2.04, excluding several entries that must be reevaluated after more data is received. At this point only nine programs have received a grade of 3. Additional work is in progress to create a more specific grading system and to maximize response rate. Future goals also include submission for IRB approval. This research will be an important analysis for medical students with an interest in IM who are pursuing a career in PM&R, and for PM&R residency programs who wish to incorporate IM modalities into graduate medical education in accordance with the most recent ACP guidelines.

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Evaluation of the current level of incorporation of an integrative medicine curriculum into national physical medicine & rehabilitation residency training

The most recently released American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines on treatment of acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain (LBP) suggest a departure from standard medical therapy and an emphasis on integrative medicine (IM) modalities. The guidelines state that non-drug therapies should be used by physicians and patients for acute and subacute LBP. This includes superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, and spinal manipulation. For chronic LBP, the ACP recommends supplementation of non-drug therapy with exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based exercise, tai chi, yoga, and more. The object of this study is to determine if and how integrative medicine modalities are being incorporated into Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (PM&R) residency training across the country. Data was gathered through email-based outreach to the eighty-seven accredited PM&R residency programs as listed on the AMA FREIDA database. At this point in the research, responses have been obtained from just over 50% of the programs. A preliminary grading system has been established in an attempt to standardize the responses. A grade of “3” was given to programs in which residents receive non-voluntary, organized exposure to IM. A grade of “2” was given to programs in which residents receive voluntary and/or informal exposure to IM, and a grade of “1” was given to programs in which residents receive no official exposure to IM but faculty practice may include some IM modalities. Of the responses received to date, the average grade across all eighty-seven residency programs was found to be roughly 2.04, excluding several entries that must be reevaluated after more data is received. At this point only nine programs have received a grade of 3. Additional work is in progress to create a more specific grading system and to maximize response rate. Future goals also include submission for IRB approval. This research will be an important analysis for medical students with an interest in IM who are pursuing a career in PM&R, and for PM&R residency programs who wish to incorporate IM modalities into graduate medical education in accordance with the most recent ACP guidelines.