School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Characterization of the Memory Antibody Response to Zika in a Flavivirus-Endemic Region of Colombia

Poster Number

279

Document Type

Poster

Status

Staff

Abstract Category

Immunology/Infectious Diseases

Keywords

Zika, Flavivirus Immunity, Memory Antibody Response

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

(Title)

Characterization of the Memory Antibody Response to Zika in a Flavivirus-Endemic Region of Colombia.

(Primary Presenter)

Grace Mantus

(Co-Authors)

Grace Mantus, Liliana Encinales, Andres Angelo Cadena Bonfanti, Nelly Pacheco, Aileen Chang, Rebecca Lynch

(Abstract)

With an increasing number of Zika vaccines moving through clinical trials, there is a need to better understand the antibody response caused by Zika infection in flavivirus endemic areas. In this study, we sought to determine the longevity and characteristics of the memory antibody response to Zika infection in 40 Colombian individuals infected during the 2016 epidemic. Luciferase-based neutralization assays using a recombinant viral particle (RVP) system were performed to determine individual’s neutralizing antibody titers against dengue serotypes 1 and 2 and Zika. Based on the results of the Zika RVP assay, individuals were classified as positive (ID50>500; n=20) or negative (ID50<500; n=20) for previous Zika infection. Within the Zika+ group, neutralization was further tested for sensitivity to a mutation in the lateral ridge (LR) of the Zika domain III E protein (K394A). Zika+ individuals had significantly higher neutralizing titers against dengue-1 and dengue-2 than Zika- individuals. There was no significant difference observed in the overall ability of the Zika+ group to neutralize the K394A mutant as compared to wildtype, but rare individuals demonstrated a reduction in neutralization of the mutant virus. Overall, we observed that the effects of Zika infection on an individual’s antibody response are long-lasting. Elevated titers of dengue neutralizing antibodies appear to persist at least 8 months post infection. This observation suggests that Zika infection triggers a boost in neutralizing antibody responses across dengue serotypes in flavi-immune individuals. Despite the isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies against the LR in both humans and mice challenged with Zika, we did not detect significant titers of Zika neutralizing antibodies targeting the LR. While these antibodies might be present, they do not appear to be the immunodominant response in the majority of persons infected with Zika in Colombia.

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Characterization of the Memory Antibody Response to Zika in a Flavivirus-Endemic Region of Colombia

(Title)

Characterization of the Memory Antibody Response to Zika in a Flavivirus-Endemic Region of Colombia.

(Primary Presenter)

Grace Mantus

(Co-Authors)

Grace Mantus, Liliana Encinales, Andres Angelo Cadena Bonfanti, Nelly Pacheco, Aileen Chang, Rebecca Lynch

(Abstract)

With an increasing number of Zika vaccines moving through clinical trials, there is a need to better understand the antibody response caused by Zika infection in flavivirus endemic areas. In this study, we sought to determine the longevity and characteristics of the memory antibody response to Zika infection in 40 Colombian individuals infected during the 2016 epidemic. Luciferase-based neutralization assays using a recombinant viral particle (RVP) system were performed to determine individual’s neutralizing antibody titers against dengue serotypes 1 and 2 and Zika. Based on the results of the Zika RVP assay, individuals were classified as positive (ID50>500; n=20) or negative (ID50<500; n=20) for previous Zika infection. Within the Zika+ group, neutralization was further tested for sensitivity to a mutation in the lateral ridge (LR) of the Zika domain III E protein (K394A). Zika+ individuals had significantly higher neutralizing titers against dengue-1 and dengue-2 than Zika- individuals. There was no significant difference observed in the overall ability of the Zika+ group to neutralize the K394A mutant as compared to wildtype, but rare individuals demonstrated a reduction in neutralization of the mutant virus. Overall, we observed that the effects of Zika infection on an individual’s antibody response are long-lasting. Elevated titers of dengue neutralizing antibodies appear to persist at least 8 months post infection. This observation suggests that Zika infection triggers a boost in neutralizing antibody responses across dengue serotypes in flavi-immune individuals. Despite the isolation of potent neutralizing antibodies against the LR in both humans and mice challenged with Zika, we did not detect significant titers of Zika neutralizing antibodies targeting the LR. While these antibodies might be present, they do not appear to be the immunodominant response in the majority of persons infected with Zika in Colombia.