School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

A Model to Translate Rehabilitation Evidence into Practice

Poster Number

219

Document Type

Poster

Status

Staff

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

Interdisciplinary, Translational, Clinical Practice, Technology, Communication, Innovation

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Abstract:

In light of the Impact Act of 2014 and a series of bundled payment initiatives, many post-acute care (PAC) providers are or will be in a state of transition while they try to provide high-quality care with an increasing focus on lowering costs. The current and impending changes in PAC present a unique opportunity for the collection and dissemination of emerging local innovative strategies PAC providers are developing to address these challenges.

We propose the creation of Mobilizing Post-Acute Care, a free open-access medical education (FOAM) PAC portal of resources and community of experts, as a mechanism to translate research into practice. The use of FOAM has become a growing trend across medical specialties, with the FOAM philosophy that high-quality medical education and resources can, and should be free and accessible to all. Consumers of FOAM are encouraged to re-use and modify resources to fit their needs, but a common critique is FOAM content is not peer-reviewed and therefore the value, validity, and utility of the information shared is suspect. Mobilizing PAC will disseminate FOAM content designed to assist in the development, evaluation, and dissemination of field-tested and innovative practice models, evaluation strategies, and policies that enhance healthcare value in PAC settings. Mobilizing PAC resources will be developed and shared by, a multidisciplinary, collaborative, and expansive PAC community, to improve communication, collaboration, and the timely dissemination of evidence-based and novel strategies within the PAC community.

Mobilizing PAC will create a space for dynamic conversation among providers, researchers, and consumers in the PAC community. Mobilizing PAC is modelled after our successful Urgent Matters FOAM program, which serves as a dissemination vehicle for novel strategies on improving emergency department patient flow and quality by engaging audiences in educational webinars, blogs, podcasts, as well as an annual innovation award that recognizes leading innovations in emergency medicine. Urgent Matters started in 2002 as a ten-hospital collaborative Learning Network that provided breakthrough research on patient flow measurement and improvement. Now with over 7,500 subscribers and an editorial board composed of top Emergency Physician groups in the United States, Urgent Matters has grown to a nationally-recognized resource for innovative strategies and tools in the emergency medicine community. Mobilizing PAC will use the Urgent Matters model and employ similar dissemination channels to provide a collection of enduring, tailorable, and effective solutions for others in the PAC community to improve their delivery of care and patient outcomes.

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A Model to Translate Rehabilitation Evidence into Practice

Abstract:

In light of the Impact Act of 2014 and a series of bundled payment initiatives, many post-acute care (PAC) providers are or will be in a state of transition while they try to provide high-quality care with an increasing focus on lowering costs. The current and impending changes in PAC present a unique opportunity for the collection and dissemination of emerging local innovative strategies PAC providers are developing to address these challenges.

We propose the creation of Mobilizing Post-Acute Care, a free open-access medical education (FOAM) PAC portal of resources and community of experts, as a mechanism to translate research into practice. The use of FOAM has become a growing trend across medical specialties, with the FOAM philosophy that high-quality medical education and resources can, and should be free and accessible to all. Consumers of FOAM are encouraged to re-use and modify resources to fit their needs, but a common critique is FOAM content is not peer-reviewed and therefore the value, validity, and utility of the information shared is suspect. Mobilizing PAC will disseminate FOAM content designed to assist in the development, evaluation, and dissemination of field-tested and innovative practice models, evaluation strategies, and policies that enhance healthcare value in PAC settings. Mobilizing PAC resources will be developed and shared by, a multidisciplinary, collaborative, and expansive PAC community, to improve communication, collaboration, and the timely dissemination of evidence-based and novel strategies within the PAC community.

Mobilizing PAC will create a space for dynamic conversation among providers, researchers, and consumers in the PAC community. Mobilizing PAC is modelled after our successful Urgent Matters FOAM program, which serves as a dissemination vehicle for novel strategies on improving emergency department patient flow and quality by engaging audiences in educational webinars, blogs, podcasts, as well as an annual innovation award that recognizes leading innovations in emergency medicine. Urgent Matters started in 2002 as a ten-hospital collaborative Learning Network that provided breakthrough research on patient flow measurement and improvement. Now with over 7,500 subscribers and an editorial board composed of top Emergency Physician groups in the United States, Urgent Matters has grown to a nationally-recognized resource for innovative strategies and tools in the emergency medicine community. Mobilizing PAC will use the Urgent Matters model and employ similar dissemination channels to provide a collection of enduring, tailorable, and effective solutions for others in the PAC community to improve their delivery of care and patient outcomes.