School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Improving Access to Pediatric Sub-Specialty Care Using DTC Telemedicine by Addressing Barriers

Poster Number

346

Document Type

Poster

Status

Faculty

Abstract Category

Health Sciences

Keywords

Health Disparities, Pediatrics, Telemedicine, Direct-to-Consumer, Underserved Populations

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Lack of access to pediatric subspecialty care is a barrier to pediatric health. On average patients wait 44.9 days for an in – person visit. Telemedicine is emerging as a new modality to provide pediatric care. However, most public and private insurers still do not pay for direct-to-consumer telemedicine services. In 2016, we established a sub-specialty direct-to-consumer (DTC) telemedicine program for underserved pediatric patients in a pediatric health system, providing subspecialty virtual visits, free of charge. In order to have a successful DTC telemedicine program our hospital system established a relationship with a DTC telehealth vendor. The underserved children this telemedicine program served are uninsured children and Medicaid children in DC, MD, VA.

Objective: The goal of this study was to describe the impact of a DTC telemedicine program, track metrics for consultations with patients and assess provider’s perceptions of the program.

Methods Used: This was a mixed methods study utilizing the telemedicine platform, web based surveys, and focus groups. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize visit metrics, and survey responses. Patient and provider satisfaction surveys were updated and reviewed for thematic content.

Summary of Results: Between April 2016 and September 2017, our program completed 226 DTC telemedicine subspecialty follow-up appointments. The average wait time for virtual visits across all specialties was 1.87 minutes, compared to the average wait time of 78.2 minutes across specialties for an in-person follow-up during the same time period. On average DTC telemedicine saved 4,542 miles travelled over 96 consults (58 miles/consult saved). Preliminary survey data from parents are currently being analyzed from patients and families utilizing our DTC telemedicine service. We are quantifying their opinions by asking them about their impression of their Telemedicine consult pre- and post-visit.

Conclusions: Our preliminary data has demonstrated a positive patient perception of DTC telemedicine. DTC telemedicine programs provide an opportunity for payers, hospitals and patients to address the needs of underserved pediatric patients for subspecialty care.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Improving Access to Pediatric Sub-Specialty Care Using DTC Telemedicine by Addressing Barriers

Background: Lack of access to pediatric subspecialty care is a barrier to pediatric health. On average patients wait 44.9 days for an in – person visit. Telemedicine is emerging as a new modality to provide pediatric care. However, most public and private insurers still do not pay for direct-to-consumer telemedicine services. In 2016, we established a sub-specialty direct-to-consumer (DTC) telemedicine program for underserved pediatric patients in a pediatric health system, providing subspecialty virtual visits, free of charge. In order to have a successful DTC telemedicine program our hospital system established a relationship with a DTC telehealth vendor. The underserved children this telemedicine program served are uninsured children and Medicaid children in DC, MD, VA.

Objective: The goal of this study was to describe the impact of a DTC telemedicine program, track metrics for consultations with patients and assess provider’s perceptions of the program.

Methods Used: This was a mixed methods study utilizing the telemedicine platform, web based surveys, and focus groups. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize visit metrics, and survey responses. Patient and provider satisfaction surveys were updated and reviewed for thematic content.

Summary of Results: Between April 2016 and September 2017, our program completed 226 DTC telemedicine subspecialty follow-up appointments. The average wait time for virtual visits across all specialties was 1.87 minutes, compared to the average wait time of 78.2 minutes across specialties for an in-person follow-up during the same time period. On average DTC telemedicine saved 4,542 miles travelled over 96 consults (58 miles/consult saved). Preliminary survey data from parents are currently being analyzed from patients and families utilizing our DTC telemedicine service. We are quantifying their opinions by asking them about their impression of their Telemedicine consult pre- and post-visit.

Conclusions: Our preliminary data has demonstrated a positive patient perception of DTC telemedicine. DTC telemedicine programs provide an opportunity for payers, hospitals and patients to address the needs of underserved pediatric patients for subspecialty care.