School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Exercise as Adjunctive Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Educational Intervention Can Increase Physician Awareness

Poster Number

221

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Education/Health Services

Keywords

Education, IBD, Exercise, Physical activity

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Exercise has been shown to be safe and have symptom reduction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there has been inconsistent incorporation of physical activity in IBD management recommendations. This study evaluated physician awareness of exercise upon IBD and evaluated the impact of an educational intervention upon integrating exercise into IBD treatment plans.

Surveys were administered to physicians in a gastroenterology university practice which addressed the frequency of inquiring about and recommending exercise to IBD patients. A week following survey administration, a brief educational presentation of the current data on the effect of exercise upon IBD was given. Physicians were subsequently surveyed about whether the presentation was helpful and the likelihood that exercise would be recommended to IBD patients. Likert scales were used to evaluate ordinal data. All surveys were anonymous.

9 of 14 physicians (64.3%) completed the initial survey. Most indicated that IBD patients were rarely or never asked about their physical activity (0 always, 0 usually, 2 sometimes, 6 rarely, 1 never), and that most patients rarely or never received recommendations for exercise (0 always, 2 usually, 1 sometimes, 4 rarely, 2 never). Following the educational presentation, 9 of 14 physicians (64.3%) responded and indicated that the information was helpful and that increased effort would be made to discuss exercise (5 strongly agreed, 4 agreed). No respondents were neutral, disagreed or strongly disagreed with recommending exercise to IBD patients.

This study demonstrated that physicians inconsistently ask or recommend exercise to IBD patients and that an educational intervention can increase physician awareness of the therapeutic effects of exercise upon IBD. While this study is limited based upon sample size and self-reporting, it can serve as a basis for additional investigations that focus on exercise, IBD and optimization of clinical outcomes.

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Exercise as Adjunctive Therapy in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An Educational Intervention Can Increase Physician Awareness

Exercise has been shown to be safe and have symptom reduction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, there has been inconsistent incorporation of physical activity in IBD management recommendations. This study evaluated physician awareness of exercise upon IBD and evaluated the impact of an educational intervention upon integrating exercise into IBD treatment plans.

Surveys were administered to physicians in a gastroenterology university practice which addressed the frequency of inquiring about and recommending exercise to IBD patients. A week following survey administration, a brief educational presentation of the current data on the effect of exercise upon IBD was given. Physicians were subsequently surveyed about whether the presentation was helpful and the likelihood that exercise would be recommended to IBD patients. Likert scales were used to evaluate ordinal data. All surveys were anonymous.

9 of 14 physicians (64.3%) completed the initial survey. Most indicated that IBD patients were rarely or never asked about their physical activity (0 always, 0 usually, 2 sometimes, 6 rarely, 1 never), and that most patients rarely or never received recommendations for exercise (0 always, 2 usually, 1 sometimes, 4 rarely, 2 never). Following the educational presentation, 9 of 14 physicians (64.3%) responded and indicated that the information was helpful and that increased effort would be made to discuss exercise (5 strongly agreed, 4 agreed). No respondents were neutral, disagreed or strongly disagreed with recommending exercise to IBD patients.

This study demonstrated that physicians inconsistently ask or recommend exercise to IBD patients and that an educational intervention can increase physician awareness of the therapeutic effects of exercise upon IBD. While this study is limited based upon sample size and self-reporting, it can serve as a basis for additional investigations that focus on exercise, IBD and optimization of clinical outcomes.