School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Longitudinal follow up of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma

Poster Number

206

Document Type

Poster

Status

Undergraduate Student

Abstract Category

Clinical Specialties

Keywords

Scleroderma Sine Scleroderma, Rheumatology, Longitudinal Analysis, Patient Demographics, Internal Organ Involvement

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Introduction

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis. Scleroderma Sine Scleroderma is a subtype of scleroderma in which there is autoantibody positivity as well as internal organ involvement without skin involvement. The purpose of this study was to investigate longitudinal outcomes in a cohort of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma.

Methodology

This research was conducted via the STOP Scleroderma Study, a biospecimen and data repository approved by The George Washington University IRB (051427). All subjects gave written informed consent for longitudinal collection of their data. Of the 66 scleroderma patients enrolled in the STOP scleroderma study at the time of data lock, 17 fulfilled criteria for scleroderma sine scleroderma. Data was collected on baseline demographics, and longitudinal measures of disease activity were collected at each clinical visit including the modified Rodnan skin score and the Medsger severity score. Data was analyzed using GraphPad Prism (version 5.0).

Results

Organ involvement was seen in 4 of the 17 patients who had sine scleroderma at enrollment with a mean follow up of 5.90 ± 4.65 years. There was no significant difference in age between patients with (54.13 ± 13.26 years) and without organ involvement (41.19 ± 2.84 years, p=0.138). Of the patients who developed organ involvement, 50.00% were African Americans and 50.00% Caucasians. There was no significant difference in race between patients with complications and without complications (p=0.272). Internal organ involvement included pulmonary (11.76%), GI tract (5.88%), cutaneous (5.88%), and vascular (11.76%) complications.

Conclusion

In this cohort of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma, only 23.53% of patients developed internal organ involvement during follow-up indicating scleroderma sine scleroderma generally carries a good prognosis. Ongoing longitudinal follow up of this cohort is planned.

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Longitudinal follow up of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma

Introduction

Scleroderma is an autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation, vasculopathy, and fibrosis. Scleroderma Sine Scleroderma is a subtype of scleroderma in which there is autoantibody positivity as well as internal organ involvement without skin involvement. The purpose of this study was to investigate longitudinal outcomes in a cohort of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma.

Methodology

This research was conducted via the STOP Scleroderma Study, a biospecimen and data repository approved by The George Washington University IRB (051427). All subjects gave written informed consent for longitudinal collection of their data. Of the 66 scleroderma patients enrolled in the STOP scleroderma study at the time of data lock, 17 fulfilled criteria for scleroderma sine scleroderma. Data was collected on baseline demographics, and longitudinal measures of disease activity were collected at each clinical visit including the modified Rodnan skin score and the Medsger severity score. Data was analyzed using GraphPad Prism (version 5.0).

Results

Organ involvement was seen in 4 of the 17 patients who had sine scleroderma at enrollment with a mean follow up of 5.90 ± 4.65 years. There was no significant difference in age between patients with (54.13 ± 13.26 years) and without organ involvement (41.19 ± 2.84 years, p=0.138). Of the patients who developed organ involvement, 50.00% were African Americans and 50.00% Caucasians. There was no significant difference in race between patients with complications and without complications (p=0.272). Internal organ involvement included pulmonary (11.76%), GI tract (5.88%), cutaneous (5.88%), and vascular (11.76%) complications.

Conclusion

In this cohort of patients with scleroderma sine scleroderma, only 23.53% of patients developed internal organ involvement during follow-up indicating scleroderma sine scleroderma generally carries a good prognosis. Ongoing longitudinal follow up of this cohort is planned.