School of Medicine and Health Sciences Poster Presentations

Title

Hospital Readmissions Among Patients With Skin Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study, 2014

Poster Number

245

Document Type

Poster

Status

Medical Student

Abstract Category

Health Policy and Management

Keywords

Hospital readmissions, Nationwide Readmission Database, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, dermatology hospitalizations, inpatient dermatology.

Publication Date

Spring 2018

Abstract

Background: Hospital readmissions represent a costly and potentially preventable form of hospitalization; however, readmissions following dermatology hospitalizations remain poorly characterized.

Objective: To assess the frequency and demographics of readmissions for skin disease.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of dermatology hospitalizations using the 2014 Nationwide Readmissions Database.

Results: Readmissions following dermatologic hospitalizations cost the United States healthcare system approximately $1.05 billion in 2014. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate was 12.63% for the 647,251 identified hospitalizations for skin disease. Readmission was most common following hospitalizations for cutaneous lymphomas (39.62%), connective tissue disorders (26.28%), and cutaneous congenital abnormalities (23.86%). Predictors of readmission included public insurance (Medicaid odds ratio (OR) 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 -1.70, Medicare OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.48-1.62), residence in low income communities (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), an increasing number of chronic conditions (OR 4.46, 95% CI 4.20-4.80), and large hospitals (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05-1.16). Non-teaching hospitals (urban OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.87-0.94, rural OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.73-0.82) were protective for readmissions from skin disease.

Limitations: We were unable to assess if inpatient dermatology consultation, or linkage to an outpatient dermatologist, influenced the likelihood of readmission.

Conclusions: There are significant healthcare and demographic disparities in readmissions for skin disease.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Open Access

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Hospital Readmissions Among Patients With Skin Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study, 2014

Background: Hospital readmissions represent a costly and potentially preventable form of hospitalization; however, readmissions following dermatology hospitalizations remain poorly characterized.

Objective: To assess the frequency and demographics of readmissions for skin disease.

Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of dermatology hospitalizations using the 2014 Nationwide Readmissions Database.

Results: Readmissions following dermatologic hospitalizations cost the United States healthcare system approximately $1.05 billion in 2014. The 30-day all-cause readmission rate was 12.63% for the 647,251 identified hospitalizations for skin disease. Readmission was most common following hospitalizations for cutaneous lymphomas (39.62%), connective tissue disorders (26.28%), and cutaneous congenital abnormalities (23.86%). Predictors of readmission included public insurance (Medicaid odds ratio (OR) 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.53 -1.70, Medicare OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.48-1.62), residence in low income communities (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.09-1.20), an increasing number of chronic conditions (OR 4.46, 95% CI 4.20-4.80), and large hospitals (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.05-1.16). Non-teaching hospitals (urban OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.87-0.94, rural OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.73-0.82) were protective for readmissions from skin disease.

Limitations: We were unable to assess if inpatient dermatology consultation, or linkage to an outpatient dermatologist, influenced the likelihood of readmission.

Conclusions: There are significant healthcare and demographic disparities in readmissions for skin disease.